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Applies to openSUSE Leap 15.2

4 Configuration and Installation Options Edit source

This section contains configuration examples for services, registration, user and group management, upgrades, partitioning, configuration management, SSH key management, firewall configuration, and other installation options.

This chapter introduces important parts of a control file for standard purposes. To learn about other available options, use the configuration management system.

Note that for some configuration options to work, additional packages need to be installed, depending on the software selection you have configured. If you choose to install a minimal system then some packages might be missing and need to be added to the individual package selection.

YaST will install packages required in the second phase of the installation and before the post-installation phase of AutoYaST has started. However, if necessary YaST modules are not available in the system, important configuration steps will be skipped. For example, no security settings will be configured if yast2-security is not installed.

4.1 General Options Edit source

The general section includes all settings that influence the installation workflow. The overall structure of this section looks like the following:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE profile>
<profile xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns"
 xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
 <general>
  <ask-list>1
   ...
  </ask-list>
  <cio_ignore>
   ...
  </cio_ignore>
  <mode>2
   ...
  </mode>
  <proposals>3
   ...
  </proposals>
  <self_update>4
   ...
  </self_update>
  <self_update_url>
   ...
  </self_update_url>
  <semi-automatic config:type="list">5
   ...
  </semi-automatic>
  <signature-handling>6
   ...
  </signature-handling>
  <storage>7
   ...
  </storage>
  <wait>8
   ...
  </wait>
 </general>
<profile>

4.1.1 The Mode Section Edit source

The mode section configures the behavior of AutoYaST with regard to user confirmations and rebooting. The following elements are allowed in the mode section:

activate_systemd_default_target

If you set this entry to false, the default systemd target will not be activated via the call systemctl isolate. Setting this value is optional. The default is true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <activate_systemd_default_target config:type="boolean">
   true
  </activate_systemd_default_target>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
confirm

By default, the installation stops at the Installation Settings screen. Up to this point, no changes have been made to the system and settings may be changed on this screen. To proceed and finally start the installation, the user needs to confirm the settings. By setting this value to false the settings are automatically accepted and the installation starts. Only set to false to carry out a fully unattended installation. Setting this value is optional. The default is true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <confirm config:type="boolean">true</confirm>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
confirm_base_product_license

If you set this to true, the EULA of the base product will be shown. The user needs to accept this license. Otherwise the installation will be canceled. Setting this value is optional. The default is false. This setting applies to the base product license only. Use the flag confirm_license in the add-on section for additional licenses (see Section 4.8.3, “Installing Additional/Customized Packages or Products” for details).

<general>
 <mode>
  <confirm_base_product_license config:type="boolean">
   false
  </confirm_base_product_license>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
final_halt

When set to true, the machine shuts down after everything is installed and configured at the end of the second stage. If you enable final_halt, you do not need to set the final_reboot option to true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <final_halt config:type="boolean">false</final_halt>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
final_reboot

When set to true, the machine reboots after everything is installed and configured at the end of the second stage. If you enable final_reboot, you do not need to set the final_halt option to true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <final_reboot config:type="boolean">true</final_reboot>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
final_restart_services

If you set this entry to false, services will not be restarted at the end of the installation (when everything is installed and configured at the end of the second stage). Setting this value is optional. The default is true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <final_restart_services config:type="boolean">
   true
  </final_restart_services>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
forceboot

Some openSUSE releases use Kexec to avoid the reboot after the first stage. They immediately boot into the installed system. You can force a reboot by setting this to true. Setting this value is optional. The default is set by the product.

<general>
 <mode>
  <forceboot config:type="boolean">false</forceboot>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
Important
Important: Drivers May Need a Reboot

Some drivers, for example the proprietary drivers for Nvidia and ATI graphics cards, need a reboot and will not work properly when using Kexec. Therefore the default on openSUSE Leap products is to always do a proper reboot.

halt

Shuts down the machine after the first stage. All packages and the boot loader have been installed and all your chroot scripts have run. Instead of rebooting into stage two, the machine is turned off. If you turn it on again, the machine boots and the second stage of the autoinstallation starts. Setting this value is optional. The default is false.

<general>
 <mode>
  <halt config:type="boolean">false</halt>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
max_systemd_wait

Specifies how long AutoYaST waits (in seconds) at most for systemd to set up the default target. Setting this value is optional and should not normally be required. The default is 30 (seconds).

<general>
 <mode>
  <max_systemd_wait config:type="integer">30</max_systemd_wait>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>
ntp_sync_time_before_installation

Specify the NTP server with which to synchronize time before starting the installation. Time synchronization will only occur if this option is set. Keep in mind that you need a network connection and access to a time server. Setting this value is optional. By default no time synchronization will occur.

<general>
     <mode>
      <ntp_sync_time_before_installation>
       &ntpname;
      </max_systemd_wait>
     </mode>
     ...
    </general>
second_stage

A regular installation of openSUSE Leap is performed in a single stage. The auto-installation process, however, is divided into two stages. After the installation of the basic system the system boots into the second stage where the system configuration is done. Set this option to false to disable the second stage. Setting this value is optional. The default is true.

<general>
 <mode>
  <second_stage config:type="boolean">true</second_stage>
 </mode>
 ...
</general>

4.1.2 Configuring the Installation Settings Screen Edit source

AutoYaST allows you to configure the Installation Settings screen, which shows a summary of the installation settings. On this screen, the user can change the settings before confirming them to start the installation. Using the proposal tag, you can control which settings (proposals) are shown in the installation screen. A list of valid proposals for your products is available from the /control.xml file on the installation medium. This setting is optional. By default all configuration options will be shown.

<proposals config:type="list">
 <proposal>partitions_proposal</proposal>
 <proposal>timezone_proposal</proposal>
 <proposal>software_proposal</proposal>
</proposals>

4.1.3 The Self-Update Section Edit source

During the installation, YaST can update itself to solve bugs in the installer that were discovered after the release. Refer to the Deployment Guide for further information about this feature.

Important
Important: Quarterly Media Update: Self-Update Disabled

The installer self-update is only available if you use the GM images of the Unified Installer and Packages ISOs. If you install from the ISOs published as quarterly update (they can be identified by the string QU in the name), the installer cannot update itself, because this feature has been disabled in the update media.

Use the following tags to configure the YaST self-update:

self_update

If set to true or false, this option enables or disables the YaST self-update feature. Setting this value is optional. The default is true.

<general>
 <self_update config:type="boolean">true</self_update>
 ...
</general>

Alternatively, you can specify the boot parameter self_update=1 on the kernel command line.

self_update_url

Location of the update repository to use during the YaST self-update. For more information, refer to the Deployment Guide.

Important
Important: Installer Self-Update Repository Only

The self_update_url parameter expects only the installer self-update repository URL. Do not supply any other repository URL—for example the URL of the software update repository.

<general>
 <self_update_url>
  http://example.com/updates/$arch
 </self_update_url>
 ...
</general>

The URL may contain the variable $arch. It will be replaced by the system's architecture, such as x86_64, s390x, etc.

Alternatively, you can specify the boot parameter self_update=1 together with self_update=URL on the kernel command line.

4.1.4 The Semi-Automatic Section Edit source

AutoYaST offers to start some YaST modules during the installation. This is useful to give the administrators installing the machine the possibility to manually configure some aspects of the installation while at the same time automating the rest of the installation. Within the semi-automatic section, you can start the following YaST modules:

  • The network settings module (networking)

  • The partitioner (partitioning)

  • The registration module (scc)

The following example starts all three supported YaST modules during the installation:

<general>
 <semi-automatic config:type="list">
  <semi-automatic_entry>networking</semi-automatic_entry>
  <semi-automatic_entry>scc</semi-automatic_entry>
  <semi-automatic_entry>partitioning</semi-automatic_entry>
 </semi-automatic>
</general>

4.1.5 The Signature Handling Section Edit source

By default AutoYaST will only install signed packages from sources with known GPG keys. Use this section to overwrite the default settings.

Warning
Warning: Overwriting the Signature Handling Defaults

Installing unsigned packages, packages with failing checksum checks, or packages from sources you do not trust is a major security risk. Packages may have been modified and may install malicious software on your machine. Only overwrite the defaults in this section if you are sure the repository and packages can be trusted. SUSE is not responsible for any problems arising from software installed with integrity checks disabled.

Default values for all options are false. If an option is set to false and a package or repository fails the respective test, it is silently ignored and will not be installed.

accept_unsigned_file

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept unsigned files like the content file.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <accept_unsigned_file config:type="boolean">
   false
  </accept_unsigned_file>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>
accept_file_without_checksum

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept files without a checksum in the content file.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <accept_file_without_checksum config:type="boolean">
   false
  </accept_file_without_checksum>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>
accept_verification_failed

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept signed files even when the signature verification fails.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <accept_verification_failed config:type="boolean">
   false
  </accept_verification_failed>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>
accept_unknown_gpg_key

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept new GPG keys of the installation sources, for example the key used to sign the content file.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <accept_unknown_gpg_key config:type="boolean">
   false
  </accept_unknown_gpg_key>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>
accept_non_trusted_gpg_key

Set this option to true to accept known keys you have not yet trusted.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <accept_non_trusted_gpg_key config:type="boolean">
   false
  </accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>
import_gpg_key

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept and import new GPG keys on the installation source in its database.

<general>
 <signature-handling>
  <import_gpg_key config:type="boolean">
   false
  </import_gpg_key>
 </signature-handling>
 ...
<general>

4.1.6 The Wait Section Edit source

In the second stage of the installation the system is configured by running modules, for example the network configuration. Within the wait section you can define scripts that will get executed before and after a specific module has run. You can also configure a span of time in which the system is inactive (sleeps) before and after each module.

pre-modules

Defines scripts and sleep time executed before a configuration module starts. The following code shows an example setting the sleep time to ten seconds and executing an echo command before running the network configuration module.

<general>
 <wait>
  <pre-modules config:type="list">
   <module>
    <name>networking</name>
    <sleep>
     <time config:type="integer">10</time>
     <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
    </sleep>
    <script>
     <source>echo foo</source>
     <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
    </script>
   </module>
  </pre-modules>
  ...
 </wait>
<general>
post-modules

Defines scripts and sleep time executed after a configuration module starts. The following code shows an example setting the sleep time to ten seconds and executing an echo command after running the network configuration module.

<general>
 <wait>
  <post-modules config:type="list">
   <module>
    <name>networking</name>
    <sleep>
     <time config:type="integer">10</time>
     <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
    </sleep>
    <script>
     <source>echo foo</source>
     <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
    </script>
   </module>
  </post-modules>
  ...
 </wait>
<general>

4.1.7 Examples for the general Section Edit source

Find examples covering several use cases in this section.

Example 4.1: General Options

This example shows the most commonly used options in the general section. The scripts in the pre- and post-modules sections are only dummy scripts illustrating the concept.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE profile>
<profile xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns"
 xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
 <general>
  <! -- Use cio_ignore on &zseries; only -->
  <cio_ignore config:type="boolean">false</cio_ignore>
  <mode>
   <halt config:type="boolean">false</halt>
   <forceboot config:type="boolean">false</forceboot>
   <final_reboot config:type="boolean">false</final_reboot>
   <final_halt config:type="boolean">false</final_halt>
   <confirm_base_product_license config:type="boolean">
    false
   </confirm_base_product_license>
   <confirm config:type="boolean">true</confirm>
   <second_stage config:type="boolean">true</second_stage>
  </mode>
  <proposals config:type="list">
   <proposal>partitions_proposal</proposal>
  </proposals>
  <self_update config:type="boolean">true</self_update>
  <self_update_url>http://example.com/updates/$arch</self_update_url>
  <signature-handling>
   <accept_unsigned_file config:type="boolean">
    true
   </accept_unsigned_file>
   <accept_file_without_checksum config:type="boolean">
    true
   </accept_file_without_checksum>
   <accept_verification_failed config:type="boolean">
    true
   </accept_verification_failed>
   <accept_unknown_gpg_key config:type="boolean">
    true
   </accept_unknown_gpg_key>
   <import_gpg_key config:type="boolean">true</import_gpg_key>
   <accept_non_trusted_gpg_key config:type="boolean">
   true
   </accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>
  </signature-handling>
  <storage>
   <partition_alignment config:type="symbol">
    align_cylinder
   </partition_alignment>
  </storage>
  <wait>
   <pre-modules config:type="list">
    <module>
     <name>networking</name>
     <sleep>
      <time config:type="integer">10</time>
      <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
     </sleep>
     <script>
     <source>&gt;![CDATA[
echo "Sleeping 10 seconds"
      ]]&gt;</source>
     <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
     </script>
    </module>
   </pre-modules>
   <post-modules config:type="list">
    <module>
     <name>networking</name>
     <sleep>
      <time config:type="integer">10</time>
      <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
     </sleep>
     <script>
      <source>&gt;![CDATA[
echo "Sleeping 10 seconds"
      ]]&gt;</source>
      <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
     </script>
    </module>
   </post-modules>
  </wait>
 </general>
</profile>

4.2 Reporting Edit source

The report resource manages three types of pop-ups that may appear during installation:

  • message pop-ups (usually non-critical, informative messages),

  • warning pop-ups (if something might go wrong),

  • error pop-ups (in case an error occurs).

Example 4.2: Reporting Behavior
<report>
  <errors>
    <show config:type="boolean">true</show>
    <timeout config:type="integer">0</timeout>
    <log config:type="boolean">true</log>
  </errors>
  <warnings>
    <show config:type="boolean">true</show>
    <timeout config:type="integer">10</timeout>
    <log config:type="boolean">true</log>
  </warnings>
  <messages>
    <show config:type="boolean">true</show>
    <timeout config:type="integer">10</timeout>
    <log config:type="boolean">true</log>
  </messages>
  <yesno_messages>
    <show config:type="boolean">true</show>
    <timeout config:type="integer">10</timeout>
    <log config:type="boolean">true</log>
  </yesno_messages>
</report>

Depending on your experience, you can skip, log and show (with timeout) those messages. It is recommended to show all messages with timeout. Warnings can be skipped in some places but should not be ignored.

The default setting in auto-installation mode is to show errors without timeout and to show all warnings/messages with a timeout of 10 seconds.

Warning
Warning: Critical System Messages

Note that not all messages during installation are controlled by the report resource. Some critical messages concerning package installation and partitioning will show up ignoring your settings in the report section. Usually those messages will need to be answered with Yes or No.

4.3 The Boot Loader Edit source

This documentation is for yast2-bootloader and applies to GRUB 2. For older product versions shipping with legacy GRUB, refer to the documentation that comes with your distribution in /usr/share/doc/packages/autoyast2/

The general structure of the AutoYaST boot loader part looks like the following:

<bootloader>
  <loader_type>
    <!-- boot loader type (grub2 or grub2-efi) -->
  </loader_type>
  <global>
    <!--
      entries defining the installation settings for GRUB 2 and
      the generic boot code
    -->
  </global>
  <device_map config:type="list">
    <!-- entries defining the order of devices -->
  </device_map>
 </bootloader>

4.3.1 Loader Type Edit source

This defines which boot loader (UEFI or BIOS/legacy) to use. Not all architectures support both legacy and EFI variants of the boot loader. The safest (default) option is to leave the decision up to the installer.

<loader_type>LOADER_TYPE</loader_type>

Possible values for LOADER_TYPE are:

  • default: The installer chooses the correct boot loader. This is the default when no option is defined.

  • grub2: Use the legacy BIOS boot loader.

  • grub2-efi: Use the EFI boot loader.

  • none: The boot process is not managed and configured by the installer.

4.3.2 Globals Edit source

This is an important if optional part. Define here where to install GRUB 2 and how the boot process will work. Again, yast2-bootloader proposes a configuration if you do not define one. Usually the AutoYaST control file includes only this part and all other parts are added automatically during installation by yast2-bootloader. Unless you have some special requirements, do not specify the boot loader configuration in the XML file.

<global>
  <activate config:type="boolean">true</activate>
  <timeout config:type="integer">10</timeout>
  <suse_btrfs config:type="boolean">true</suse_btrfs>
  <terminal>gfxterm</terminal>
  <gfxmode>1280x1024x24</gfxmode>
</global>

Attribute

Description

activate

Set the boot flag on the boot partition. The boot partition can be / if there is no separate /boot partition. If the boot partition is on a logical partition, the boot flag is set to the extended partition.

<activate config:type="boolean">true</activate>

append

Kernel parameters added at the end of boot entries for normal and recovery mode.

<append>nomodeset vga=0x317</append>

boot_boot

Write GRUB 2 to a separate /boot partition. If no separate /boot partition exists, GRUB 2 will be written to /.

<boot_boot>false</boot_boot>

boot_custom

Write GRUB 2 to a custom device.

<boot_custom>/dev/sda3</boot_custom>

boot_extended

Write GRUB 2 to the extended partition (important if you want to use generic boot code and the /boot partition is logical). Note: if the boot partition is logical, you should use boot_mbr (write GRUB 2 to MBR) rather than generic_mbr.

<boot_extended>false</boot_extended>

boot_mbr

Write GRUB 2 to the MBR of the first disk in the order (device.map includes order of disks).

<boot_mbr>false</boot_mbr>

boot_root

Write GRUB 2 to / partition.

<boot_root>false</boot_root>

generic_mbr

Write generic boot code to the MBR (will be ignored if boot_mbr is set to true).

<generic_mbr config:type="boolean">false</generic_mbr>

gfxmode

Graphical resolution of the GRUB 2 screen (requires <terminal> to be set to gfxterm. Valid entries are auto, HORIZONTALxVERTICAL, or HORIZONTALxVERTICALxCOLOR DEPTH. You can see the screen resolutions supported by GRUB 2 on a particular system by using the vbeinfo command at the GRUB 2 command line in the running system.

<gfxmode>1280x1024x24</gfxmode>

os_prober

If set to true, automatically searches for operating systems already installed and generates boot entries for them during the installation

<os_prober config:type="boolean">false</os_prober>

cpu_mitigations

Allows to choose a default setting of kernel boot command line parameters for CPU mitigation (and at the same time strike a balance between security and performance). Possible values are:

auto Enables all mitigations required for your CPU model, but does not protect against cross-CPU thread attacks. This setting may impact performance to some degree, depending on the workload.

nosmt Provides the full set of available security mitigations. Enables all mitigations required for your CPU model. In addition, it disables Simultaneous Multithreading (SMT) to avoid side-channel attacks across multiple CPU threads. This setting may further impact performance, depending on the workload.

off Disables all mitigations. Side-channel attacks against your CPU are possible, depending on the CPU model. This setting has no impact on performance.

manual Does not set any mitigation level. Specify your CPU mitigations manually by using the kernel command line options.

<cpu_mitigations>auto</cpu_mitigations>

If not set in AutoYaST, the respective settings can be changed via kernel command line. By default, the (product-specific) settings in the /control.xml file on the installation medium are used (if nothing else is specified).

suse_btrfs

Obsolete and no longer used. Booting from Btrfs snapshots is automatically enabled.

serial

Command to execute if the GRUB 2 terminal mode is set to serial.

<serial>
  serial --speed=115200 --unit=0 --word=8 --parity=no --stop=1
</serials>

secure_boot

If set to false, then UEFI secure boot is disabled. Works only for grub2-efi boot loader.

<secure_boot">false</secure_boot>

terminal

Specify the GRUB 2 terminal mode to use, Valid entries are console, gfxterm, and serial. If set to serial, the serial command needs to be specified with <serial>, too.

<terminal>serial</terminal>

timeout

The timeout in seconds until the default boot entry is booted automatically.

<timeout config:type="integer">10</timeout>

trusted_boot

If set to true, then Trusted GRUB is used. Trusted GRUB supports Trusted Platform Module (TPM). Works only for grub2 boot loader.

<trusted_boot">true</trusted_boot>

vgamode

Adds the kernel parameter vga=VALUE to the boot entries.

<vgamode>0x317</vgamode>

xen_append

Kernel parameters added at the end of boot entries for Xen guests.

<xen_append>nomodeset vga=0x317</xen_append>

xen_kernel_append

Kernel parameters added at the end of boot entries for Xen kernels on the VM Host Server.

<xen_kernel_append>dom0_mem=768M</xen_kernel_append>

4.3.3 Device map Edit source

GRUB 2 avoids mapping problems between BIOS drives and Linux devices by using device ID strings (UUIDs) or file system labels when generating its configuration files. GRUB 2 utilities create a temporary device map on the fly, which is usually sufficient, particularly on single-disk systems. However, if you need to override the automatic device mapping mechanism, create your custom mapping in this section.

<device_map config:type="list">
  <device_map_entry>
    <firmware>hd0</firmware> <!-- order of devices in target map  -->
    <linux>/dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3500418AS_6VM23FX0</linux> <!-- name of device (disk)  -->
  </device_map_entry>
</device_map>

4.4 Partitioning Edit source

When it comes to partitioning, we can categorize AutoYaST use cases into three different levels:

  • Automatic partitioning. The user does not care about the partitioning and trusts in AutoYaST to do the right thing.

  • Guided partitioning. The user would like to set some basic settings. For example, a user would like to use LVM but has no idea about how to configure partitions, volume groups, and so on.

  • Expert partitioning. The user specifies how the layout should look. However, a complete definition is not required, and AutoYaST should propose reasonable defaults for missing parts.

To some extent, it is like using the regular installer. You can skip the partitioning screen and trust in YaST, use the Guided Proposal, or define the partitioning layout through the Expert Partitioner.

4.4.1 Automatic Partitioning Edit source

AutoYaST can come up with a sensible partitioning layout without any user indication. Although it depends on the selected product to install, AutoYaST usually proposes a Btrfs root file system, a separate /home using XFS and a swap partition. Additionally, depending on the architecture, it adds any partition that might be needed to boot (like BIOS GRUB partitions).

However, these defaults might change depending on factors like the available disk space. For example, having a separate /home depends on the amount of available disk space.

If you want to influence these default values, you can use the approach described in Section 4.4.2, “Guided Partitioning”.

4.4.2 Guided Partitioning Edit source

Although AutoYaST can come up with a partitioning layout without any user indication, sometimes it is useful to set some generic parameters and let AutoYaST do the rest. For example, you may be interested in using LVM or encrypting your file systems without having to deal with the details. It is similar to what you would do when using the guided proposal in a regular installation.

The storage section in Example 4.3, “LVM-based Guided Partitioning” instructs AutoYaST to set up a partitioning layout using LVM and deleting all Windows partitions, no matter if needed or not.

Example 4.3: LVM-based Guided Partitioning
<general>
   <storage>
     <proposal>
       <lvm config:type="boolean">true<lvm>
       <windows_delete_mode config:type="symbol">all<windows_delete_mode>
     </proposal>
   <storage>
<general>
lvm

Create a LVM-based proposal. The default is false.

<lvm config:type="boolean">true</lvm>
resize_windows

When set to true, AutoYaST resizes Windows partitions if needed to make room for the installation.

<resize_windows config:type="boolean">false</resize_windows>
windows_delete_mode
  • none does not remove Windows partitions.

  • ondemand removes Windows partitions if needed.

  • all removes all Windows partitions.

<windows_delete_mode config:type="symbol">ondemand</windows_delete_mode>
linux_delete_mode
  • none does not remove Linux partitions.

  • ondemand removes Linux partitions if needed.

  • all removes all Linux partitions.

<linux_delete_mode config:type="symbol">ondemand</linux_delete_mode>
other_delete_mode
  • none does not remove other partitions.

  • ondemand removes other partitions if needed.

  • all removes all other partitions.

<other_delete_mode config:type="symbol">ondemand</other_delete_mode>
encryption_password

Enables encryption using the specified password. By default, encryption is disabled.

<encryption_password>some-secret</encryption_password>

4.4.3 Expert Partitioning Edit source

As an alternative to the guided partitioning, AutoYaST allows to describe the partitioning layout through a partitioning section. However, AutoYaST does not need to know every single detail and it is able to build a sensible layout from a rather incomplete specification.

The partitioning section is a list of drive elements. Each of these sections describes an element of the partitioning layout like a disk, an LVM volume group, a RAID, a multi-device Btrfs file system, and so on.

In Example 4.4, “Creating /, /home and swap partitions”, asks AutoYaST to create a /, a /home and a swap partition using the whole disk. Note that some information is missing, like which file systems each partition should use. However, that is not a problem, and AutoYaST will propose sensible values for them.

Example 4.4: Creating /, /home and swap partitions
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <use>all</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <size>20GiB</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <mount>/home</mount>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <mount>swap</mount>
        <size>1GiB</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
Tip
Tip: Proposing a Boot Partition

AutoYaST checks whether the layout described in the profile is bootable or not. If that is not the case, it adds the missing partitions. So, if you are unsure about which partitions are needed to boot, you can rely on AutoYaST to make the right decision.

4.4.3.1 Drive Configuration Edit source

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<profile>
  <partitioning config:type="list">
    <drive>
     ...
    </drive>
  </partitioning>
</profile>

Attribute

Values

Description

device

The device you want to configure in this section. You can use persistent device names via ID, like /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD3200AAKS-75L9A0_WD-WMAV27368122 or by-path, like /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0001:00:03.0-scsi-0:0:0:0.

<device>/dev/sda</device>

In case of volume groups, software RAID or bcache devices, the name in the installed system may be different (to avoid clashes with existing devices).

See Section 4.4.7, “Multipath Support” for further information about dealing with multipath devices.

Optional. If left out, AutoYaST tries to guess the device. See Tip: Skipping Devices on how to influence guessing.

If set to ask, AutoYaST will ask the user which device to use during installation.

initialize

If set to true, the partition table gets wiped out before AutoYaST starts the partition calculation.

<initialize config:type="boolean">true</initialize>

Optional. The default is false.

partitions

A list of <partition> entries (see Section 4.4.3.2, “Partition Configuration”).

<partitions config:type="list">
          <partition>...</partition>
          ...
          </partitions>

Optional. If no partitions are specified, AutoYaST will create a reasonable partitioning (see Section 4.4.3.5, “Filling the Gaps”).

pesize

This value only makes sense with LVM.

<pesize>8M</pesize>

Optional. Default is 4M for LVM volume groups.

use

Specifies the strategy AutoYaST will use to partition the hard disk.

Choose between:

  • all (uses the whole device while calculating the new partitioning),

  • linux (only existing Linux partitions are used),

  • free (only unused space on the device is used, no other partitions are touched),

  • 1,2,3 (a list of comma separated partition numbers to use).

This parameter should be provided.

type

Specify the type of the drive,

Choose between:

  • CT_DISK for physical hard disks (default),

  • CT_LVM for LVM volume groups,

  • CT_RAID for software RAID devices,

  • CT_BCACHE for software bcache devices.

<type config:type="symbol">CT_LVM</type>

Optional. Default is CT_DISK for a normal physical hard disk.

disklabel

Describes the type of the partition table.

Choose between:

  • msdos

  • gpt

  • none

<disklabel>gpt</disklabel>

Optional. By default YaST decides what makes sense. If a partition table of a different type already exists, it will be recreated with the given type only if it does not include any partition that should be kept or reused. To use the disk without creating any partition, set this element to none.

keep_unknown_lv

This value only makes sense for type=CT_LVM drives. If you are reusing a logical volume group and you set this to true, all existing logical volumes in that group will not be touched unless they are specified in the <partitioning> section. So you can keep existing logical volumes without specifying them.

<keep_unknown_lv config:type="boolean"
          >false</keep_unknown_lv>

Optional. The default is false.

enable_snapshots

Enables snapshots on Btrfs file systems mounted at / (does not apply to other file systems, or Btrfs file systems not mounted at /).

<enable_snapshots config:type="boolean"
          >false</enable_snapshots>

Optional. The default is true.

Important
Important: Beware of Data Loss

The value provided in the use property determines how existing data and partitions are treated. The value all means that the entire disk will be erased. Make backups and use the confirm property if you need to keep some partitions with important data. Otherwise, no pop-ups will notify you about partitions being deleted.

Tip
Tip: Skipping Devices

You can influence AutoYaST's device-guessing for cases where you do not specify a <device> entry on your own. Usually AutoYaST would use the first device it can find that looks reasonable but you can configure it to skip some devices like this:

<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <initialize config:type="boolean">true</initialize>
    <skip_list config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <!-- skip devices that use the usb-storage driver -->
        <skip_key>driver</skip_key>
        <skip_value>usb-storage</skip_value>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <!-- skip devices that are smaller than 1GB -->
        <skip_key>size_k</skip_key>
        <skip_value>1048576</skip_value>
        <skip_if_less_than config:type="boolean">true</skip_if_less_than>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <!-- skip devices that are larger than 100GB -->
        <skip_key>size_k</skip_key>
        <skip_value>104857600</skip_value>
        <skip_if_more_than config:type="boolean">true</skip_if_more_than>
      </listentry>
    </skip_list>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

For a list of all possible <skip_key>s, run yast2 ayast_probe on a system that has already been installed.

4.4.3.2 Partition Configuration Edit source

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<drive>
  <partitions config:type="list">
    <partition>
      ...
    </partition>
  </partitions>
</drive>

Attribute

Values

Description

create

Specify if this partition or logical volume must be created or if it already exists.

<create config:type="boolean" >false</create>

If set to false, you also need to set one of partition_nr, lv_name, label or uuid to tell AutoYaST which device to use.

crypt_method

Partition will be encrypted using one of these methods:

  • luks1: regular LUKS1 encryption.

  • pervasive_luks2: pervasive volume encryption.

  • protected_swap: encryption with volatile protected key.

  • secure_swap: encryption with volatile secure key.

  • random_swap: encryption with volatile random key.

<crypt_method config:type="symbol">luks1</crypt_method>

Optional. Encryption method selection was introduced in openSUSE Leap 15.2. To mimic the behaviour of previous versions, use luks1.

See crypt_key element to find out how to specify the encryption password if needed.

crypt_fs

Partition will be encrypted. This element is deprecated, use crypt_method instead.

<crypt_fs config:type="boolean">true</crypt_fs>

Default is false.

crypt_key

Encryption key

<crypt_key>xxxxxxxx</crypt_key>

Needed if crypt_method has been set to a method that requires a password (i.e., luks1 or pervasive_luks2).

mount

The mount point of this partition.

<mount>/</mount>
<mount>swap</mount>

You should have at least a root partition (/) and a swap partition.

fstopt

Mount options for this partition.

<fstopt>
  ro,noatime,user,data=ordered,acl,user_xattr
</fstopt>

See man mount for available mount options.

label

The label of the partition. Useful when formatting the device (especially if the mountby parameter is set to label) and for identifying a device that already exists (see create above).

<label>mydata</label>

See man e2label for an example.

uuid

The uuid of the partition. Only useful for identifying an existing device (see create above), the uuid cannot be enforced for new devices.

<uuid
>1b4e28ba-2fa1-11d2-883f-b9a761bde3fb</uuid>

See man uuidgen.

size

The size of the partition, for example 4G, 4500M, etc. The /boot partition and the swap partition can have auto as size. Then AutoYaST calculates a reasonable size. One partition can have the value max to use all remaining space.

You can also specify the size in percentage. So 10% will use 10% of the size of the hard disk or volume group. You can mix auto, max, size, and percentage as you like.

<size>10G</size>

Starting with openSUSE Leap 15, all values (including auto and max) can be used for resizing partitions as well.

format

Specify if AutoYaST should format the partition.

<format config:type="boolean">false</format>

If you set create to true, then you likely want this option set to true as well.

file system

Specify the file system to use on this partition:

  • btrfs

  • ext2

  • ext3

  • ext4

  • fat

  • xfs

  • swap

<filesystem config:type="symbol"
>ext3</filesystem>

Optional. The default is btrfs for the root partition (/) and xfs for data partitions.

mkfs_options

Specify an option string that is added to the mkfs command.

<mkfs_options>-I 128</mkfs_options>

Optional. Only use this when you know what you are doing.

partition_nr

The partition number of this partition. If you have set create=false or if you use LVM, then you can specify the partition via partition_nr. You can force AutoYaST to only create primary partitions by assigning numbers below 5.

<partition_nr config:type="integer"
>2</partition_nr>

Usually, numbers 1 to 4 are primary partitions while 5 and higher are logical partitions.

partition_id

The partition_id sets the id of the partition. If you want different identifiers than 131 for Linux partition or 130 for swap, configure them with partition_id.

<partition_id config:type="integer"
>131</partition_id>

Possible values are:

Swap: 130
Linux: 131
LVM: 142
MD RAID: 253
EFI partition: 259

The default is 131 for Linux partition and 130 for swap.

partition_type

When using an msdos partition table, this element sets the type of the partition. The value can be primary or logical. This value is ignored when using a gpt partition table, because such a distinction does not exist in that case.

<partition_type>primary</partition_type>

Optional. Allowed values are primary (default) and logical.

mountby

Instead of a partition number, you can tell AutoYaST to mount a partition by device, label, uuid, path or id, which are the udev path and udev id (see /dev/disk/...).

<mountby config:type="symbol"
>label</mountby>

See label and uuid documentation above. The default depends on YaST and usually is id.

subvolumes

List of subvolumes to create for a file system of type Btrfs. This key only makes sense for file systems of type Btrfs. See Section 4.4.3.3, “Btrfs subvolumes” for more information.

<subvolumes config:type="list">
  <path>tmp</path>
  <path>opt</path>
  <path>srv</path>
  <path>var/crash</path>
  <path>var/lock</path>
  <path>var/run</path>
  <path>var/tmp</path>
  <path>var/spool</path>
  ...
</subvolumes>

If no subvolumes section has been defined for a partition description, AutoYaST will create a predefined set of subvolumes for the given mount point.

create_subvolumes

Determine whether Btrfs subvolumes should be created or not.

It is set to true by default. When set to false, no subvolumes will be created.

subvolumes_prefix

Set the Btrfs subvolumes prefix name. If no prefix is wanted, it must be set to an empty value:

<subvolumes_prefix><![CDATA[]]></subvolumes_prefix>

It is set to @ by default.

lv_name

If this partition is on a logical volume in a volume group, specify the logical volume name here (see the is_lvm_vg parameter in the drive configuration).

<lv_name>opt_lv</lv_name>

stripes

An integer that configures LVM striping. Specify across how many devices you want to stripe (spread data).

<stripes config:type="integer">2</stripes>

stripesize

Specify the size of each block in KB.

<stripesize config:type="integer"
>4</stripesize>

lvm_group

If this is a physical partition used by (part of) a volume group (LVM), you need to specify the name of the volume group here.

<lvm_group>system</lvm_group>

pool

pool must be set to true if the LVM logical volume should be an LVM thin pool.

<pool config:type="boolean">false</pool>

used_pool

The name of the LVM thin pool that is used as a data store for this thin logical volume. If this is set to something non-empty, it implies that the volume is a so-called thin logical volume.

<used_pool>my_thin_pool</used_pool>

raid_name

If this physical volume is part of a RAID, specify the name of the RAID.

<raid_name>/dev/md/0</raid_name>

raid_options

Specify RAID options, see below.

<raid_options>...</raid_options>

Setting the RAID options at partition level is deprecated. See Section 4.4.6, “Software RAID”.

bcache_backing_for

If this device is used as a bcache backing device, specify the name of the bcache device.

<bcache_backing_for>/dev/bcache0</bcache_backing_for>

See Section 4.4.8, “bcache Configuration” for further details.

bcache_caching_for

If this device is used as a bcache caching device, specify the names of the bcache devices.

<bcache_caching_for config:type="list">
  <listentry>/dev/bcache0</listentry>
</bcache_caching_for>

See Section 4.4.8, “bcache Configuration” for further details.

resize

This boolean must be true if an existing partition should be resized. In this case, you need to tell AutoYaST to reuse the device (see create) and specify a size.

<resize config:type="boolean">false</resize>

Starting with openSUSE Leap 15 resizing works with physical disk partitions and with LVM volumes.

4.4.3.3 Btrfs subvolumes Edit source

As mentioned in Section 4.4.3.2, “Partition Configuration”, it is possible to define a set of subvolumes for each Btrfs file system. In its simplest form, this is a list of entries:

<subvolumes config:type="list">
  <path>tmp</path>
  <path>opt</path>
  <path>srv</path>
  <path>var/crash</path>
  <path>var/lock</path>
  <path>var/run</path>
  <path>var/tmp</path>
  <path>var/spool</path>
</subvolumes>

AutoYaST supports disabling copy-on-write for a given subvolume. In that case, a slightly more complex syntax should be used:

<subvolumes config:type="list">
<listentry>tmp</listentry>
<listentry>opt</listentry>
<listentry>srv</listentry>
<listentry>
  <path>var/lib/pgsql</path>
  <copy_on_write config:type="boolean">false</copy_on_write>
</listentry>
</subvolumes>

If there is a default subvolume used for the distribution (for example @ in openSUSE Leap), the name of this default subvolume is automatically prefixed to the names in this list. This behavior can be disabled by setting the subvolumes_prefix.

<subvolumes_prefix><![CDATA[]]></subvolumes_prefix>

4.4.3.4 Using the Whole Disk Edit source

AutoYaST allows to use a whole disk without creating any partition by setting the disklabel to none as described in Section 4.4.3.1, “Drive Configuration”. In such cases, the configuration in the first partition from the drive will be applied to the whole disk.

In the example below, we are using the second disk (/dev/sdb) as the /home file system.

Example 4.5: Using a Whole Disk as a File System
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <create config:type="boolean">true</create>
        <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sdb</device>
    <disklabel>none</disklabel>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
        <mount>/home</mount>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>

In addition, the whole disk can be used as an LVM physical volume or as a software RAID member. See Section 4.4.5, “Logical Volume Manager (LVM)” and Section 4.4.6, “Software RAID” for further details about setting up an LVM or a software RAID.

For backward compatibility reasons, it is possible to achieve the same result by setting the <partition_nr> element to 0. However, this usage of the <partition_nr> element is deprecated since openSUSE Leap 15.

4.4.3.5 Filling the Gaps Edit source

When using the Expert Partitioner approach, AutoYaST can create a partition plan from a rather incomplete profile. The following profiles show how you can describe some details of the partitioning layout and let AutoYaST do the rest.

Example 4.6: Automated Partitioning on Selected Drives

The following is an example of a single drive system, which is not pre-partitioned and should be automatically partitioned according to the described pre-defined partition plan. If you do not specify the device, it will be automatically detected.

<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

A more detailed example shows how existing partitions and multiple drives are handled.

Example 4.7: Installing on Multiple Drives
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <use>all</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <size>10G</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <mount>swap</mount>
        <size>1G</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sdb</device>
    <use>free</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
        <mount>/data1</mount>
        <size>15G</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">xfs</filesystem>
        <mount>/data2</mount>
        <size>auto</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

4.4.4 Advanced Partitioning Features Edit source

4.4.4.1 Wipe out Partition Table Edit source

Usually this is not needed because AutoYaST can delete partitions one by one automatically. But you need the option to let AutoYaST clear the partition table instead of deleting partitions individually.

Go to the drive section and add:

<initialize config:type="boolean">true</initialize>

With this setting AutoYaST will delete the partition table before it starts to analyze the actual partitioning and calculates its partition plan. Of course this means, that you cannot keep any of your existing partitions.

4.4.4.2 Mount Options Edit source

By default a file system to be mounted is identified in /etc/fstab by the device name. This identification can be changed so the file system is found by searching for a UUID or a volume label. Note that not all file systems can be mounted by UUID or a volume label. To specify how a partition is to be mounted, use the mountby property which has the symbol type. Possible options are:

  • device (default)

  • label

  • UUID

If you choose to mount a new partition using a label, use the label property to specify its value.

Add any valid mount option in the fourth field of /etc/fstab. Multiple options are separated by commas. Possible fstab options:

Mount read-only (ro)

No write access to the file system. Default is false.

No access time (noatime)

Access times are not updated when a file is read. Default is false.

Mountable by User (user)

The file system can be mounted by a normal user. Default is false.

Data Journaling Mode (ordered, journal, writeback)
journal

All data is committed to the journal prior to being written to the main file system.

ordered

All data is directly written to the main file system before its metadata is committed to the journal.

writeback

Data ordering is not preserved.

Access Control List (acl)

Enable access control lists on the file system.

Extended User Attributes (user_xattr)

Allow extended user attributes on the file system.

Example 4.8: Mount Options
<partitions config:type="list">
  <partition>
    <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
    <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
    <fstopt>ro,noatime,user,data=ordered,acl,user_xattr</fstopt>
    <mount>/local</mount>
    <mountby config:type="symbol">uuid</mountby>
    <partition_id config:type="integer">131</partition_id>
    <size>10G</size>
  </partition>
</partitions>
Note
Note: Check Supported File System Options

Different file system types support different options. Check the documentation carefully before setting them.

4.4.4.3 Keeping Specific Partitions Edit source

In some cases you should leave partitions untouched and only format specific target partitions, rather than creating them from scratch. For example, if different Linux installations coexist, or you have another operating system installed, likely you do not want to wipe these out. You may also want to leave data partitions untouched.

Such scenarios require specific knowledge about the target systems and hard disks. Depending on the scenario, you might need to know the exact partition table of the target hard disk with partition IDs, sizes and numbers. With this data, you can tell AutoYaST to keep certain partitions, format others and create new partitions if needed.

The following example will keep partitions 1, 2 and 5 and delete partition 6 to create two new partitions. All remaining partitions will only be formatted.

Example 4.9: Keeping partitions
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sdc</device>
      <partitions config:type="list">
        <partition>
          <create config:type="boolean">false</create>
          <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
          <mount>/</mount>
          <partition_nr config:type="integer">1</partition_nr>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <create config:type="boolean">false</create>
          <format config:type="boolean">false</format>
          <partition_nr config:type="integer">2</partition_nr>
          <mount>/space</mount>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <create config:type="boolean">false</create>
          <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
          <filesystem config:type="symbol">swap</filesystem>
          <partition_nr config:type="integer">5</partition_nr>
          <mount>swap</mount>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
          <mount>/space2</mount>
          <size>5G</size>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
          <mount>/space3</mount>
          <size>max</size>
        </partition>
      </partitions>
    <use>6</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

The last example requires exact knowledge of the existing partition table and the partition numbers of those partitions that should be kept. In some cases however, such data may not be available, especially in a mixed hardware environment with different hard disk types and configurations. The following scenario is for a system with a non-Linux OS with a designated area for a Linux installation.

Keeping partitions
Figure 4.1: Keeping partitions

In this scenario, shown in figure Figure 4.1, “Keeping partitions”, AutoYaST will not create new partitions. Instead it searches for certain partition types on the system and uses them according to the partitioning plan in the control file. No partition numbers are given in this case, only the mount points and the partition types (additional configuration data can be provided, for example file system options, encryption and file system type).

Example 4.10: Auto-detection of partitions to be kept.
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <create config:type="boolean">false</create>
        <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">131</partition_id>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <create config:type="boolean">false</create>
        <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">swap</filesystem>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">130</partition_id>
        <mount>swap</mount>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
</partitioning>
Note
Note: Keeping Encrypted Devices

When AutoYaST is probing the storage devices, the partitioning section from the profile is not yet analyzed. In some scenarios, it is not clear which key should be used to unlock a device. For example, this can happen when more than one encryption key is defined. To solve this problem, AutoYaST will try all defined keys on all encrypted devices until a working key is found.

4.4.5 Logical Volume Manager (LVM) Edit source

To configure LVM, first create a physical volume using the normal partitioning method described above.

Example 4.11: Create LVM Physical Volume

The following example shows how to prepare for LVM in the partitioning resource. A non-formatted partition is created on device /dev/sda1 of the type LVM and with the volume group system. This partition will use all space available on the drive.

<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <create config:type="boolean">true</create>
        <lvm_group>system</lvm_group>
        <partition_type>primary</partition_type>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">142</partition_id>
        <partition_nr config:type="integer">1</partition_nr>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>
Example 4.12: LVM Logical Volumes
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <lvm_group>system</lvm_group>
        <partition_type>primary</partition_type>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/system</device>
      <is_lvm_vg config:type="boolean">true</is_lvm_vg>
      <partitions config:type="list">
        <partition>
          <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
          <lv_name>user_lv</lv_name>
          <mount>/usr</mount>
          <size>15G</size>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
          <lv_name>opt_lv</lv_name>
          <mount>/opt</mount>
          <size>10G</size>
        </partition>
        <partition>
          <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
          <lv_name>var_lv</lv_name>
          <mount>/var</mount>
          <size>1G</size>
        </partition>
      </partitions>
      <pesize>4M</pesize>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

It is possible to set the size to max for the logical volumes. Of course, you can only use max for one(!) logical volume. You cannot set two logical volumes in one volume group to max.

4.4.6 Software RAID Edit source

The support for software RAID devices has been greatly improved in openSUSE Leap 15.2.

If needed, see Section 4.4.6.1, “Using the Deprecated Syntax” to find out further details about the old way of specifying a software RAID, which is still supported for backward compatibility.

Using AutoYaST, you can create and assemble software RAID devices. The supported RAID levels are the following:

RAID 0

This level increases your disk performance. There is no redundancy in this mode. If one of the drives crashes, data recovery will not be possible.

RAID 1

This mode offers the best redundancy. It can be used with two or more disks. An exact copy of all data is maintained on all disks. As long as at least one disk is still working, no data is lost. The partitions used for this type of RAID should have approximately the same size.

RAID 5

This mode combines management of a larger number of disks and still maintains some redundancy. This mode can be used on three disks or more. If one disk fails, all data is still intact. If two disks fail simultaneously, all data is lost.

Multipath

This mode allows access to the same physical device via multiple controllers for redundancy against a fault in a controller card. This mode can be used with at least two devices.

Similar to LVM, a software RAID definition in an AutoYaST profile is composed of two different parts:

  • Determining which disks or partitions are going to be used as RAID members. In order to do that, you need to set the raid_name element in such devices.

  • Defining the RAID itself by using a dedicated drive section.

The following example shows a RAID1 configuration that uses a partition from the first disk and another one from the second disk as RAID members:

Example 4.13: RAID1 Configuration
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <size>20G</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <raid_name>/dev/md/0</raid_name>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sdb</device>
    <disklabel>none</disklabel>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <raid_name>/dev/md/0</raid_name>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/md/0</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/home</mount>
        <size>40G</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <mount>/srv</mount>
        <size>10G</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <raid_options>
      <chunk_size>4</chunk_size>
      <parity_algorithm>left_asymmetric</parity_algorithm>
      <raid_type>raid1</raid_type>
    </raid_options>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

If you do not want to create partitions in the software RAID, set the disklabel to none as you would do for a regular disk. In the example below, only the RAID drive section is shown for simplicity's sake:

Example 4.14: RAID1 Without Partitions
<drive>
  <device>/dev/md/0</device>
  <disklabel>none</disklabel>
  <partitions config:type="list">
    <partition>
      <mount>/home</mount>
      <size>40G</size>
    </partition>
  </partitions>
  <raid_options>
    <chunk_size>4</chunk_size>
    <parity_algorithm>left_asymmetric</parity_algorithm>
    <raid_type>raid1</raid_type>
  </raid_options>
  <use>all</use>
</drive>

4.4.6.1 Using the Deprecated Syntax Edit source

If the installer self-update feature is enabled, it is possible to partition a software RAID for openSUSE Leap 15. However, that scenario was not supported in previous versions and hence the way to define a software RAID was slightly different.

This section defines what the old-style configuration looks like because it is still supported for backward compatibility.

Keep the following in mind when configuring a RAID using this deprecated syntax:

  • The device for RAID is always /dev/md.

  • The property partition_nr is used to determine the MD device number. If partition_nr is equal to 0, then /dev/md/0 is configured. Adding several partition sections means that you want to have multiple software RAIDs (/dev/md/0, /dev/md/1, etc.).

  • All RAID-specific options are contained in the raid_options resource.

Example 4.15: Old Style RAID1 Configuration
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">253</partition_id>
        <format config:type="boolean">false</format>
        <raid_name>/dev/md0</raid_name>
        <raid_type>raid1</raid_type>
        <size>4G</size>
      </partition>

        <!-- Insert a configuration for the regular partitions located on
                /dev/sda here (for example / and swap) -->

    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sdb</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <format config:type="boolean">false</format>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">253</partition_id>
        <raid_name>/dev/md0</raid_name>
        <size>4gb</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/md</device>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
        <format config:type="boolean">true</format>
        <mount>/space</mount>
        <partition_id config:type="integer">131</partition_id>
        <partition_nr config:type="integer">0</partition_nr>
        <raid_options>
          <chunk_size>4</chunk_size>
          <parity_algorithm>left_asymmetric</parity_algorithm>
        </raid_options>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

4.4.6.2 RAID Options Edit source

The following elements must be placed within the following XML structure:

<partition>
     <raid_options>
     ...
     </raid_options>
     </partition>

Attribute

Values

Description

chunk_size

<chunk_size>4</chunk_size>

parity_algorithm

Possible values are:

left_asymmetric, left_symmetric, right_asymmetric, right_symmetric.

For RAID6 and RAID10 the following values can be used:

parity_first, parity_last, left_asymmetric_6, left_symmetric_6, right_asymmetric_6, right_symmetric_6, parity_first_6, n2, o2, f2, n3, o3, f3

<parity_algorithm
          >left_asymmetric</parity_algorithm>

raid_type

Possible values are: raid0, raid1, raid5, raid6 and raid10.

<raid_type>raid1</raid_type>

The default is raid1.

device_order

This list contains the order of the physical devices:

<device_order config:type="list">
          <device>/dev/sdb2</device>
          <device>/dev/sda1</device>
          ...
          </device_order>

This is optional and the default is alphabetical order.

4.4.7 Multipath Support Edit source

AutoYaST can handle multipath devices. In order to take advantage of them, you need to enable multipath support, as shown in Example 4.16, “Using Multipath Devices”. Alternatively, you can use the following parameter on the Kernel command line: LIBSTORAGE_MULTIPATH_AUTOSTART=ON.

Unlike SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, it is not required to set the drive section type to CT_DMMULTIPATH. You should use CT_DISK, although for historical reasons, both values are equivalent.

Example 4.16: Using Multipath Devices
<general>
  <storage>
    <start_multipath config:type="boolean">true</start_multipath>
  <storage>
</general>
<partitioning>
  <drive>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <size>20G</size>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <size>auto</size>
        <mount>swap</mount>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_DISK</type>
    <use>all</use>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

If you want to specify the device, you could use the World Wide Identifier (WWID), its device name (for example, /dev/dm-0), any other path under /dev/disk that refers to the multipath device or any of its paths.

For example, given the multipath listing from Example 4.17, “Listing multipath devices”, you could use /dev/mapper/14945540000000000f86756dce9286158be4c6e3567e75ba5, /dev/dm-3, any other corresponding path under /dev/disk (like shown in the Example 4.18, “Using the WWID to Identify a Multipath Device”), or any of its paths (/dev/sda or /dev/sdb).

Example 4.17: Listing multipath devices
# multipath -l
14945540000000000f86756dce9286158be4c6e3567e75ba5 dm-3 ATA,VIRTUAL-DISK
size=40G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw
|-+- policy='service-time 0' prio=1 status=active
| `- 2:0:0:0 sda 8:0  active ready running
`-+- policy='service-time 0' prio=1 status=enabled
  `- 3:0:0:0 sdb 8:16 active ready running
Example 4.18: Using the WWID to Identify a Multipath Device
<drive>
  <partitions config:type="list">
    <device>/dev/mapper/14945540000000000f86756dce9286158be4c6e3567e75ba5</device>
    <partition>
      <size>20G</size>
      <mount>/</mount>
      <filesystem config:type="symbol">ext4</filesystem>
    </partition>
  </partitions>
  <type config:type="symbol">CT_DISK</type>
  <use>all</use>
</drive>

4.4.8 bcache Configuration Edit source

bcache is a caching system which allows the use of multiple fast drives to speed up the access to one or more slower drives. For example, you can improve the performance of a large (but slow) drive by using a fast one as a cache.

For more information about bcache on openSUSE Leap, also see the blog post at https://www.suse.com/c/combine-the-performance-of-solid-state-drive-with-the-capacity-of-a-hard-drive-with-bcache-and-yast/.

To set up a bcache device, AutoYaST needs a profile that specifies the following:

  • To set a (slow) block device as backing device, use the bcache_backing_for element.

  • To set a (fast) block device as caching device, use the bcache_caching_for element. You can use the same device to speed up the access to several drives.

  • To specify the layout of the bcache device, use a drive section and set the type element to CT_BCACHE. The layout of the bcache device may contain partitions.

Example 4.19: bcache Definition
<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>/dev/sda</device>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_DISK</type>
    <use>all</use>
    <enable_snapshots config:type="boolean">true</enable_snapshots>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">btrfs</filesystem>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <create config:type="boolean">true</create>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">swap</filesystem>
        <mount>swap</mount>
        <create config:type="boolean">true</create>
        <size>2GiB</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>

  <drive>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_DISK</type>
    <device>/dev/sdb</device>
    <disklabel>msdos</disklabel>
    <use>all</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <!-- It can serve as caching device for several bcaches -->
        <bcache_caching_for config:type="list">
          <listentry>/dev/bcache0</listentry>
        </bcache_caching_for>
        <size>max</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>

  <drive>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_DISK</type>
    <device>/dev/sdc</device>
    <use>all</use>
    <disklabel>msdos</disklabel>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <!-- It can serve as backing device for one bcache -->
        <bcache_backing_for>/dev/bcache0</bcache_backing_for>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>

  <drive>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_BCACHE</type>
    <device>/dev/bcache0</device>
    <bcache_options>
      <cache_mode>writethrough</cache_mode>
    </bcache_options>
    <use>all</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/data</mount>
        <size>20GiB</size>
      </partition>
      <partition>
        <mount>swap</mount>
        <filesystem config:type="symbol">swap</filesystem>
        <size>1GiB</size>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

For the time being, the only supported option in the bcache_options section is cache_mode, described in the table below.

Attribute

Values

Description

cache_mode

<cache_mode>writethrough</cache_mode>

Cache mode for bcache. Possible values are writethrough, writeback, writearound and none.

4.4.9 NFS Configuration Edit source

AutoYaST allows to install openSUSE Leap onto Network File System (NFS) shares. To do so, you have to create a drive with the CT_NFS type and provide the NFS share name (SERVER:PATH) as device name. The information relative to the mount point is included as part of its first partition section. Note that for an NFS drive, only the first partition is taken into account.

For more information on how to configure an NFS client and server after the system has been installed, refer to Section 4.4.9, “NFS Configuration”.

Example 4.20: NFS Share Definition
        <partitioning config:type="list">
          <drive>
            <device>192.168.1.1:/exports/root_fs</device>
            <type config:type="symbol">CT_NFS</type>
            <use>all</use>
            <partitions config:type="list">
              <partition>
                <mount>/</mount>
                <fstopt>nolock</fstopt>
              </partition>
            </partitions>
          </drive>
        </partitioning>

4.5 iSCSI Initiator Overview Edit source

Using the iscsi-client resource, you can configure the target machine as an iSCSI client.

Example 4.21: iSCSI client
  <iscsi-client>
    <initiatorname>iqn.2013-02.de.suse:01:e229358d2dea</initiatorname>
    <targets config:type="list">
      <listentry>
         <authmethod>None</authmethod>
         <portal>192.168.1.1:3260</portal>
         <startup>onboot</startup>
         <target>iqn.2001-05.com.doe:test</target>
         <iface>default</iface>
      </listentry>
    </targets>
    <version>1.0</version>
  </iscsi-client>

Attribute

Description

initiatorname

InitiatorName is a value from /etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi. In case you have iBFT, this value will be added from there and you are only able to change it in the BIOS setup.

version

Version of the YaST module. Default: 1.0

targets

List of targets. Each entry contains:

authmethod Authentication method: None/CHAP

portal Portal address

startup Value: manual/onboot

target Target name

iface Interface name

4.6 Fibre Channel over Ethernet Configuration (FCoE) Edit source

Using the fcoe_cfg resource, you can configure a Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE).

Example 4.22: FCoE configuration
  <fcoe-client>
    <fcoe_cfg>
      <DEBUG>no</DEBUG>
      <USE_SYSLOG>yes</USE_SYSLOG>
    </fcoe_cfg>
    <interfaces config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <dev_name>eth3</dev_name>
        <mac_addr>01:000:000:000:42:42</mac_addr>
        <device>Gigabit 1313</device>
        <vlan_interface>200</vlan_interface>
        <fcoe_vlan>eth3.200</fcoe_vlan>
        <fcoe_enable>yes</fcoe_enable>
        <dcb_required>yes</dcb_required>
        <auto_vlan>no</auto_vlan>
        <dcb_capable>no</dcb_capable>
        <cfg_device>eth3.200</cfg_device>
      </listentry>
    </interfaces>
    <service_start>
      <fcoe config:type="boolean">true</fcoe>
      <lldpad config:type="boolean">true</lldpad>
    </service_start>
  </fcoe-client>

Attribute

Description

Values

fcoe_cfg

DEBUG is used to enable or disable debugging messages from the fcoe service script and fcoemon.

USE_SYSLOG messages are sent to the system log if set to yes.

yes/no

interfaces

List of network cards including the status of VLAN and FCoE configuration.

service_start

Enable or disable the start of the services fcoe and lldpad boot time.

Starting the fcoe service means starting the Fibre Channel over Ethernet service daemon fcoemon which controls the FCoE interfaces and establishes a connection with the lldpad daemon.

The lldpad service provides the Link Layer Discovery Protocol agent daemon lldpad, which informs fcoemon about DCB (Data Center Bridging) features and configuration of the interfaces.

yes/no

4.7 Country Settings Edit source

Language, timezone, and keyboard settings.

Example 4.23: Language
       <language>
         <language>en_GB</language>
         <languages>de_DE,en_US</languages>
       </language>

Attribute

Description

Values

language

Primary language

A list of available languages can be found under /usr/share/YaST2/data/languages

languages

Secondary languages separated by commas

A list of available languages can be found under /usr/share/YaST2/data/languages

If the configured value for the primary language is unknown, it will be reset to the default, en_US.

Example 4.24: Timezone
       <timezone>
         <hwclock>UTC</hwclock>
         <timezone>Europe/Berlin</timezone>
       </timezone>

Attribute

Description

Values

hwclock

Whether the hardware clock uses local time or UTC

localtime/UTC

timezone

Timezone

A list of available time zones can be found under /usr/share/YaST2/data/timezone_raw.ycp

Example 4.25: Keyboard
       <keyboard>
         <keymap>german</keymap>
       </keyboard>

Attribute

Description

Values

keymap

Keyboard layout

Keymap-code values or keymap-alias values are valid. A list of available entries can be found in /usr/share/YaST2/data/keyboards.rb. For example, english-us, us, english-uk, uk,...

4.8 Software Edit source

4.8.1 Package Selection with Patterns and Packages Sections Edit source

Patterns or packages are configured like this:

Example 4.26: Package Selection in the Control File with Patterns and Packages Sections
<software>
  <patterns config:type="list">
    <pattern>directory_server</pattern>
  </patterns>
  <packages config:type="list">
    <package>apache</package>
    <package>postfix</package>
  </packages>
  <do_online_update config:type="boolean">true</do_online_update>
</software>
Note
Note: Package and Pattern Names

The values are real package or pattern names. If the package name has been changed because of an upgrade, you will need to adapt these settings too.

4.8.2 Deploying Images Edit source

You can use images during installation to speed up the installation.

Example 4.27: Activating Image Deployment
<!-- note! this is not in the software section! -->
<deploy_image>
  <image_installation config:type="boolean">false</image_installation>
</deploy_image>

4.8.3 Installing Additional/Customized Packages or Products Edit source

In addition to the packages available for installation on the DVD-ROMs, you can add external packages including customized kernels. Customized kernel packages must be compatible to the SUSE packages and must install the kernel files to the same locations.

Unlike in earlier in versions, you do not need a special resource in the control file to install custom and external packages. Instead you need to re-create the package database and update it with any new packages or new package versions in the source repository.

A script is provided for this task which will query packages available in the repository and create the package database. Use the command /usr/bin/create_package_descr. It can be found in the inst-source-utils package in the openSUSE Build Service. When creating the database, all languages will be reset to English.

Example 4.28: Creating a Package Database With the Additional Package inst-source-utils.rpm

The unpacked DVD is located in /usr/local/DVDs/LATEST.

tux > cp /tmp/inst-source-utils-2016.7.26-1.2.noarch.rpm /usr/local/DVDs/LATEST/suse/noarch
tux > cd /usr/local/DVDs/LATEST/suse
tux > create_package_descr -d /usr/local/CDs/LATEST/suse

In the above example, the directory /usr/local/CDs/LATEST/suse contains the architecture dependent (for example x86_64) and architecture independent packages (noarch). This might look different on other architectures.

The advantage of this method is that you can keep an up-to-date repository with fixed and updated package. Additionally this method makes the creation of custom CD-ROMs easier.

To add your own module such as the SDK (SUSE Software Development Kit), add a file add_on_products.xml to the installation source in the root directory.

The following example shows how the SDK module can be added to the base product repository. The complete SDK repository will be stored in the directory /sdk.

Example 4.29: add_on_products.xml

This file describes an SDK module included in the base product.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<add_on_products xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns"
   xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
   <product_items config:type="list">
      <product_item>
         <name>SUSE Linux Enterprise Software Development Kit</name>
         <url>relurl:////sdk?alias=SLE_SDK</url>
         <path>/</path>
         <-- Users are asked whether to add such a product -->
         <ask_user config:type="boolean">false</ask_user>
         <-- Defines the default state of pre-selected state in case of ask_user used. -->
         <selected config:type="boolean">true</selected>
      </product_item>
   </product_items>
</add_on_products>

Besides this special case, all other modules, extensions and add-on products can be added from almost every other location during an AutoYaST installation.

Even repositories which do not have any product or module information can be added during the installation. These are called other add-ons.

Example 4.30: Adding the SDK Extension and a User Defined Repository
<add-on>
  <add_on_products config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <media_url>cd:///sdk</media_url>
      <product>sle-sdk</product>
      <alias>SLE SDK</alias>
      <product_dir>/</product_dir>
      <priority config:type="integer">20</priority>
      <ask_on_error config:type="boolean">false</ask_on_error>
      <confirm_license config:type="boolean">false</confirm_license>
      <name>SUSE Linux Enterprise Software Development Kit</name>
    </listentry>
  </add_on_products>
  <add_on_others config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <media_url>https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/YaST:/Head/openSUSE_Leap_15.2/</media_url>
      <alias>yast2_head</alias>
      <priority config:type="integer">30</priority>
      <name>Latest YaST2 packages from OBS</name>
    </listentry>
  </add_on_others>
</add-on>

The add_on_others and add_on_products sections support the same values:

Attribute

Values

media_url

Product URL. Can have the prefix cd:///, http://, ftp://, etc. This entry is mandatory.

If you use a multi-product medium such as the SUSE Linux Enterprise Packages DVD, then the URL path should point to the root directory of the multi-product medium. The specific product directory is selected using the product_dir value (see below).

product

Internal product name if the add-on is a product. The command zypper products shows the names of installed products.

alias

Repository alias name. Defined by the user.

product_dir

Optional subpath. This should only be used for multi-product media such as the SUSE Linux Enterprise Packages DVD.

priority

Sets the repository libzypp priority. Priority of 1 is the highest. The higher the number, the lower the priority. Default is 99.

ask_on_error

AutoYaST can ask the user to make add-on products, modules or extensions available instead of reporting a time-out error when no repository can be found at the given location. Set ask_on_error to true (the default is false).

confirm_license

The user needs to confirm the license. Default is false.

name

Repository name. The command zypper lr shows the names of added repositories.

To use unsigned installation sources with AutoYaST, turn off the checks with the following configuration in your AutoYaST control file.

Note
Note: Unsigned Installation Sources—Limitations

You can only disable signature checking during the first stage of the auto-installation process. In stage two, the installed system's configuration takes precedence over AutoYaST configuration.

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<general>
  <signature-handling>
    ...
  </signature-handling>
</general>

Default values for all options are false. If an option is set to false and a package or repository fails the respective test, it is silently ignored and will not be installed. Note that setting any of these options to true is a potential security risk. Never do it when using packages or repositories from third party sources.

Attribute

Values

accept_unsigned_file

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept unsigned files like the content file.

<accept_unsigned_file config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_unsigned_file>

accept_file_without_checksum

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept files without a checksum in the content file.

<accept_file_without_checksum config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_file_without_checksum>

accept_verification_failed

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept signed files even when the verification of the signature failed.

<accept_verification_failed config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_verification_failed>

accept_unknown_gpg_key

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept new GPG keys of the installation sources, for example the key used to sign the content file.

<accept_unknown_gpg_key config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_unknown_gpg_key>

accept_non_trusted_gpg_key

Set this option to true to accept known keys you have not yet trusted.

<accept_non_trusted_gpg_key config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>

import_gpg_key

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept and import new GPG keys on the installation source in its database.

<import_gpg_key config:type="boolean"
>true</import_gpg_key>

It is possible to configure the signature handling for each add-on product, module, or extension individually. The following elements must be between the signature-handling section of the individual add-on product, module, or extension. All settings are optional. If not configured, the global signature-handling from the general section is used.

Attribute

Values

accept_unsigned_file

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept unsigned files like the content file for this add-on product.

<accept_unsigned_file config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_unsigned_file>

accept_file_without_checksum

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept files without a checksum in the content file for this add-on.

<accept_file_without_checksum config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_file_without_checksum>

accept_verification_failed

If set to true, AutoYaST will accept signed files even when the verification of the signature fails.

<accept_verification_failed config:type="boolean"
>true</accept_verification_failed>

accept_unknown_gpg_key

If all is set to true, AutoYaST will accept new GPG keys on the installation source.

<accept_unknown_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">true</all>
</accept_unknown_gpg_key>

Otherwise you can define single keys too.

<accept_unknown_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">false</all>
  <keys config:type="list">
    <keyid>3B3011B76B9D6523</keyid>
  </keys>
</accept_unknown_gpg_key>

accept_non_trusted_gpg_key

This means, the key is known, but it is not trusted by you.

You can trust all keys by adding:

<accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">true</all>
</accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>

Or you can trust specific keys:

<accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">false</all>
  <keys config:type="list">
    <keyid>3B3011B76B9D6523</keyid>
  </keys>
</accept_non_trusted_gpg_key>

import_gpg_key

If all is set to true, AutoYaST will accept and import all new GPG keys on the installation source into its database.

<import_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">true</all>
</import_gpg_key>

This can be done for specific keys only:

<import_gpg_key>
  <all config:type="boolean">false</all>
  <keys config:type="list">
    <keyid>3B3011B76B9D6523</keyid>
  </keys>
</import_gpg_key>

4.8.4 Kernel Packages Edit source

Kernel packages are not part of any selection. The required kernel is determined during installation. If the kernel package is added to any selection or to the individual package selection, installation will mostly fail because of conflicts.

To force the installation of a specific kernel, use the kernel property. The following is an example of forcing the installation of the default kernel. This kernel will be installed even if an SMP or other kernel is required.

Example 4.31: Kernel Selection in the Control File
<software>
  <kernel>kernel-default</kernel>
  ...
</software>

4.8.5 Removing Automatically Selected Packages Edit source

Some packages are selected automatically either because of a dependency or because it is available in a selection.

Removing these packages might break the system consistency, and it is not recommended to remove basic packages unless a replacement which provides the same services is provided. The best example for this case are mail transfer agent (MTA) packages. By default, postfix will be selected and installed. To use another MTA like sendmail, then postfix can be removed from the list of selected package using a list in the software resource. However, note that sendmail is not shipped with openSUSE Leap. The following example shows how this can be done:

Example 4.32: Package Selection in Control File
<software>
  <packages config:type="list">
    <package>sendmail</package>
  </packages>
  <remove-packages config:type="list">
    <package>postfix</package>
  </remove-packages>
</software>
Note
Note: Package Removal Failure

Note that it is not possible to remove a package that is part of a pattern (see Section 4.8.1, “Package Selection with Patterns and Packages Sections”). When specifying such a package for removal, the installation will fail with the following error message:

The package resolver run failed. Check
      your software section in the AutoYaST profile.

4.8.6 Installing Recommended Packages/Patterns Edit source

By default all recommended packages/patterns will be installed. To have a minimal installation which includes required packages only, you can switch off this behavior with the flag install_recommended. Note that this flag only affects a fresh installation and will be ignored during an upgrade.

<software>
  <install_recommended config:type="boolean">false
  </install_recommended>
</software>

Default: If this flag has not been set in the configuration file all recommended packages and no recommended pattern will be installed.

4.8.7 Installing Packages in Stage 2 Edit source

To install packages after the reboot during stage two, you can use the post-packages element for that:

<software>
  <post-packages config:type="list">
    <package>yast2-cim</package>
  </post-packages>
</software>

4.8.8 Installing Patterns in Stage 2 Edit source

You can also install patterns in stage 2. Use the post-patterns element for that:

<software>
  <post-patterns config:type="list">
    <pattern>apparmor</pattern>
  </post-patterns>
</software>

4.8.9 Online Update in Stage 2 Edit source

You can perform an online update at the end of the installation. Set the boolean do_online_update to true. Of course this only makes sense if you add an online update repository in the suse-register/customer-center section, for example, or in a post-script. If the online update repository was already available in stage one via the add-on section, then AutoYaST has already installed the latest packages available. If a kernel update is done via online-update, a reboot at the end of stage two is triggered.

<software>
  <do_online_update config:type="boolean">true</do_online_update>
</software>

4.9 Upgrade Edit source

AutoYaST can also be used for doing a system upgrade. Besides upgrade packages, the following sections are supported too:

  • scripts/pre-scripts Running user scripts very early, before anything else really happens.

  • add-on Defining an additional add-on product.

  • language Setting language.

  • timezone Setting timezone.

  • keyboard Setting keyboard.

  • software Installing additional software/patterns. Removing installed packages.

  • suse_register Running registration process.

To control the upgrade process the following sections can be defined:

Example 4.33: Upgrade and Backup
  <upgrade>
    <stop_on_solver_conflict config:type="boolean">true</stop_on_solver_conflict>
  </upgrade>
  <backup>
    <sysconfig config:type="boolean">true</sysconfig>
    <modified config:type="boolean">true</modified>
    <remove_old config:type="boolean">true</remove_old>
  </backup>

Element

Description

Comment

stop_on_solver_conflict

Halt installation if there are package dependency issues.

modified

Create backup of modified files.

sysconfig

Create backup of /etc/sysconfig directory.

remove_old

Remove backups from previous updates.

To start the AutoYaST upgrade mode, you need:

Procedure 4.1: Starting AutoYaST in Offline Upgrade Mode
  1. Copy the AutoYaST profile to /root/autoupg.xml on its file system.

  2. Boot the system from the installation medium.

  3. Select the Installation menu item.

  4. On the command line, set autoupgrade=1.

  5. Press Enter to start the upgrade process.

Procedure 4.2: Starting AutoYaST in Online Upgrade Mode
  1. Boot the system from the installation media.

  2. Select the Installation menu item.

  3. On the command line, set netsetup=dhcp autoupgrade=1 autoyast=http://192.169.3.1/autoyast.xml.

    Here network will be setup via DHCP.

  4. Press Enter to start the upgrade process.

4.10 Services and Targets Edit source

With the services-manager resource you can set the default systemd target and specify in detail which system services you want to start or deactivate and how to start them.

The default-target property specifies the default systemd target into which the system boots. Valid options are graphical for a graphical login, or multi-user for a console login.

To specify the set of services that should be started on boot, use the enable and disable lists. To start a service, add its name to the enable list. To make sure that the service is not started on boot, add it to the disable list.

If a service is not listed as enabled or disabled, a default setting is used. The default setting may be either disabled or enabled.

Finally, some services like cups support on-demand activation (socket activated services). If you want to take advantage of such a feature, list the names of those services in the on_demand list instead of enable.

Example 4.34: Configuring Services and Targets
<services-manager>
  <default_target>multi-user</default_target>
  <services>
    <disable config:type="list">
      <service>libvirtd</service>
    </disable>
    <enable config:type="list">
      <service>sshd</service>
    </enable>
    <on_demand config:type="list">
      <service>cups</service>
    </on_demand>
  </services>
</services-manager>

4.11 Network Configuration Edit source

Network configuration is used to connect a single workstation to an Ethernet-based LAN or to configure a dial-up connection. More complex configurations (multiple network cards, routing, etc.) are also provided.

If the following setting is set to true, YaST will keep network settings created during the installation (via linuxrc) and/or merge it with network settings from the AutoYaST control file (if defined).

Note
Note: The linuxrc program

For a detailed description of how linuxrc works and its keywords, see Appendix C, Advanced linuxrc Options.

AutoYaST settings have higher priority than any configuration files already present. YaST will write ifcfg-* files based on the entries in the control file without removing old ones. If there is an empty or absent DNS and routing section, YaST will keep any pre-existing values. Otherwise, settings from the control file will be applied.

<keep_install_network
config:type="boolean">true</keep_install_network>

During the second stage, installation of additional packages will take place before the network, as described in the profile, is configured. keep_install_network is set by default to true to ensure that a network is available in case it is needed to install those packages. If all packages are installed during the first stage and the network is not needed early during the second one, setting keep_install_network to false will avoid copying the configuration.

To configure network settings and activate networking automatically, one global resource, <networking> is used to store the whole network configuration.

Example 4.35: Network configuration
<networking>
  <dns>
    <dhcp_hostname config:type="boolean">true</dhcp_hostname>
    <domain>site</domain>
    <hostname>linux-bqua</hostname>
    <nameservers config:type="list">
      <nameserver>&dnsip;</nameserver>
      <nameserver>&dnsip117;</nameserver>
      <nameserver>&dnsip118;</nameserver>
    </nameservers>
    <resolv_conf_policy>auto</resolv_conf_policy>
    <searchlist config:type="list">
      <search>&exampledomain;</search>
      <search>&exampledomain1;</search>
    </searchlist>
  </dns>
  <interfaces config:type="list">
    <interface>
      <bootproto>dhcp</bootproto>
      <device>eth0</device>
      <startmode>auto</startmode>
    </interface>
  </interfaces>
  <ipv6 config:type="boolean">true</ipv6>
  <keep_install_network config:type="boolean">false</keep_install_network>
  #false means use Wicked, true means use NetworkManager
  <managed config:type="boolean">false</managed>       
  <net-udev config:type="list">
    <rule>
      <name>eth0</name>
      <rule>ATTR{address}</rule>
      <value>&wsImac;</value>
    </rule>
  </net-udev>
  <s390-devices config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <chanids>0.0.0800:0.0.0801:0.0.0802</chanids>
      <type>qeth</type>
    </listentry>
  </s390-devices>
  <routing>
    <ipv4_forward config:type="boolean">false</ipv4_forward>
    <ipv6_forward config:type="boolean">false</ipv6_forward>
    <routes config:type="list">
      <route>
        <destination>&routerintipII;</destination>
        <device>eth0</device>
        <extrapara>foo</extrapara>
        <gateway>-</gateway>
        <netmask>-</netmask>
      </route>
      <route>
        <destination>default</destination>
        <device>eth0</device>
        <gateway>&routerintipI;</gateway>
        <netmask>-</netmask>
      </route>
      <route>
        <destination>default</destination>
        <device>lo</device>
        <gateway>&gateip;</gateway>
        <netmask>-</netmask>
      </route>
    </routes>
  </routing>
</networking>

As shown in the example above, the <networking> section can be composed of a few subsections:

  • interfaces describes the configuration of the network interfaces, including their IP addresses, how they are started, etc.

  • dns specifies DNS related settings, as the host name, the list of name servers, etc.

  • routing defines the routing rules.

  • s390-devices s390-specific devices settings.

  • net-udev enumerates the udev rules used to set persistent names.

Example 4.36: Bridge Interface Configuration
<interfaces config:type="list">
  <interface>
    <device>br0</device>
    <bootproto>static</bootproto>
    <bridge>yes</bridge>
    <bridge_forwarddelay>0</bridge_forwarddelay>
    <bridge_ports>eth0 eth1</bridge_ports>
    <bridge_stp>off</bridge_stp>
    <ipaddr>192.168.122.100</ipaddr>
    <netmask>255.255.255.0</netmask>
    <network>192.168.122.0</network>
    <prefixlen>24</prefixlen>
    <startmode>auto</startmode>
  </interface>
  <interface>
    <device>eth0</device>
    <bootproto>none</bootproto>
    <startmode>hotplug</startmode>
  </interface>
  <interface>
    <device>eth1</device>
    <bootproto>none</bootproto>
    <startmode>hotplug</startmode>
  </interface>
</interfaces>
Tip
Tip: IPv6 Address Support

Using IPv6 addresses in AutoYaST is fully supported. To disable IPv6 Address Support, set <ipv6 config:type="boolean">false</ipv6>

4.11.1 Interfaces Edit source

The interfaces section allows the user to define the interfaces configuration, including how they are started, their IP addresses, networks, and more. The following elements must be enclosed in <interfaces>...</interfaces> tags.

Element

Description

Comment

bootproto

Boot protocol used by the interface. Possible values:

  • static for statically assigned addresses. It is required to specify the IP using the ipaddr element.

  • dhcp4, dhcp6 or dhcp for setting the IP address with DHCP (IPv4, IPv6 or any).

  • dhcp+autoip to get the IPv4 configuration from Zeroconf and get IPv6 from DHCP.

  • autoip to get the IPv4 configuration from Zeroconf.

  • ibft to get the IP address using the iBFT protocol.

  • none to skip setting an address. This value is used for bridges and bonding slaves.

Required.

broadcast

Broadcast IP address.

Used only with static boot protocol.

device

Device name.

Deprecated. Use name instead.

name

Device name, for example: eth0.

Required.

ipaddr

IP address assigned to the interface.

Used only with static boot protocol. It can include a network prefix, for example: 192.168.1.1/24.

remote_ipaddr

Remote IP address for Point-to-Point connections.

Used only with static boot protocol.

netmask

Network mask, for example: 255.255.255.0.

Deprecated. Use prefixlen instead or include the network prefix in the ipaddr element.

network

Network IP address.

Deprecated. Use ipaddr with prefixlen instead.

prefixlen

Network prefix, for example: 24.

Used only with static boot protocol.

startmode

When to bring up an interface. Possible values are:

  • hotplug when the device is plugged in. Useful for USB network cards, for example.

  • auto when the system boots. onboot is a deprecated alias.

  • ifplugd when the device is managed by the ifplugd daemon.

  • manual when the device is supposed to be started manually.

  • nfsroot when the device is needed to mount the root file system, for example, when / is on a NFS volume.

  • off to never start the device.

ifplugd_priority

Priority for ifplugd daemon. It determines in which order the devices are activated.

Used only with ifplugd start mode.

usercontrol

Parameter is no longer used.

Deprecated.

bonding_slaveX

Name of the bonding device.

Required for bonding devices. X is replaced by a number starting from 0, for example bonding_slave0. Each slave needs to have a unique number.

bonding_module_opts

Options for bonding device.

Used only with bond device.

mtu

Maximum transmission unit for the interface.

Optional.

ethtool_options

Ethtool options during device activation.

Optional.

zone

Firewall zone name which the interface is assigned to.

Optional.

vlan_id

Identifier used for this VLAN.

Used only with vlan device.

etherdevice

Device to which VLAN is attached.

Used only with a vlan device and required for it.

bridge

yes if interface is a bridge.

Deprecated. It is inferred from other attributes.

bridge_ports

Space-separated list of bridge ports, for example, eth0 eth1.

Used only with bridge device and required for it.

bridge_stp

Spanning tree protocol. Possible values are on (when enabled) and off (when disabled).

Used only with a bridge device.

bridge_forward_delay

Forward delay for bridge, for example: 15.

Used only with bridge devices. Valid values are between 4 and 30.

4.11.2 Persistent Names of Network Interfaces Edit source

The net-udev element allows to specify a set of udev rules that can be used to assign persistent names to interfaces.

Element

Description

Comment

name

Network interface name, for example eth3.

Required.

rule

ATTR{address} for a MAC based rule, KERNELS for a bus ID based rule.

required

value

for example f0:de:f1:6b:da:69 for a MAC rule, 0000:00:1c.1 or 0.0.0700 for a bus ID rule

Required.

Tip
Tip: Handling Collisions in Device Names

When creating an incomplete udev rule set, the chosen device name can collide with existing device names. For example, when renaming a network interface to eth0, a collision with a device automatically generated by the kernel can occur. AutoYaST tries to handle such cases in a best effort manner and renames colliding devices.

Example 4.37: Assigning a Persistent Name Using the MAC Address
<net-udev config:type="list">
  <rule>
  <name>eth1</name>
  <rule>ATTR{address}</rule>
  <value>52:54:00:68:54:fb</value>
  </rule>
</net-udev>

4.11.3 Domain Name System Edit source

The dns section is used to define name-service related settings, such as the host name, or name servers.

Element

Description

Comment

hostname

Host name, excluding the domain name part. For example: foo (instead of foo.bar).

If a host name is not specified and is not taken from a DHCP server (see dhcp_hostname), AutoYaST will generate a random one.

nameservers

List of name servers. Example:

<nameservers config:type="list">
  <nameserver>192.168.1.116</nameserver>
  <nameserver>192.168.1.117</nameserver>
</nameservers>

searchlist

Search list for host name lookup.

<searchlist config:type="list">
  <search>example.com</search>
</searchlist>

Optional.

dhcp_hostname

Specifies whether the host name must be taken from DHCP or not.

<dhcp_hostname config:type="boolean">true</dhcp_hostname>

4.11.4 Routing Edit source

The routing table allows to specify a list of routes and the packets forwarding settings for IPv4 and IPv6.

Element

Description

Comment

ipv4_forward

Whether IP forwarding must be enabled for IPv4.

Optional.

ipv6_forward

Whether IP forwarding must be enabled for IPv6.

Optional.

routes

List of routes.

Optional.

The following table describes how routes are defined.

Element

Description

Comment

destination

Route destination. An address prefix can be specified, for example: 192.168.122.0/24.

Required.

device

Interface associated to the route.

Required.

gateway

Gateway's IP address.

Optional.

netmask

Destination's netmask.

Deprecated. Specifying the prefix as part of the destination value is preferred.

4.11.5 s390 Options Edit source

The following elements must be between the <s390-devices>...</s390-devices> tags.

Element

Description

Comment

type

qeth, ctc or iucv

chanids

channel ids separated by a colon (preferred) or a space

<chanids>0.0.0700:0.0.0701:0.0.0702</chanids>

layer2

<layer2 config:type="boolean">true</layer2>

boolean; default: false

portname

QETH port name (deprecated since openSUSE 42.2)

protocol

CTC / LCS protocol, a small number (as a string)

<protocol>1</protocol>

optional

router

IUCV router/user

In addition to the options mentioned above, AutoYaST also supports IBM Z-specific options in other sections of the configuration file. In particular, you can define the logical link address, or LLADDR (in the case of Ethernet, that is the MAC address). To do so, use the option LLADDR in the device definition.

Tip
Tip: LLADDR for VLANs

VLAN devices inherit their LLADDR from the underlying physical devices. To set a particular address for a VLAN device, set the LLADDR option for the underlying physical device.

4.11.6 Proxy Edit source

Configure your Internet proxy (caching) settings.

Configure proxies for HTTP, HTTPS, and FTP with http_proxy, https_proxy and ftp_proxy, respectively. Addresses or names that should be directly accessible need to be specified with no_proxy (space separated values). If you are using a proxy server with authorization, fill in proxy_user and proxy_password,

Example 4.38: Network configuration: Proxy
<proxy>
  <enabled config:type="boolean">true</enabled>
  <ftp_proxy>http://192.168.1.240:3128</ftp_proxy>
  <http_proxy>http://192.168.1.240:3128</http_proxy>
  <no_proxy>www.example.com .example.org localhost</no_proxy>
  <proxy_password>testpw</proxy_password>
  <proxy_user>testuser</proxy_user>
</proxy>

4.12 NIS Client and Server Edit source

Using the nis resource, you can configure the target machine as a NIS client. The following example shows a detailed configuration using multiple domains.

Example 4.39: Network configuration: NIS
 <nis>
  <nis_broadcast config:type="boolean">true</nis_broadcast>
  <nis_broken_server config:type="boolean">true</nis_broken_server>
  <nis_by_dhcp config:type="boolean">false</nis_by_dhcp>
  <nis_domain>test.com</nis_domain>
  <nis_local_only config:type="boolean">true</nis_local_only>
  <nis_options></nis_options>
  <nis_other_domains config:type="list">
    <nis_other_domain>
      <nis_broadcast config:type="boolean">false</nis_broadcast>
      <nis_domain>domain.com</nis_domain>
      <nis_servers config:type="list">
        <nis_server>10.10.0.1</nis_server>
      </nis_servers>
    </nis_other_domain>
  </nis_other_domains>
  <nis_servers config:type="list">
    <nis_server>192.168.1.1</nis_server>
  </nis_servers>
  <start_autofs config:type="boolean">true</start_autofs>
  <start_nis config:type="boolean">true</start_nis>
</nis>

4.13 NIS Serve Edit source

You can configure the target machine as a NIS server. NIS Master Server and NIS Slave Server and a combination of both are available.

Example 4.40: NIS Server Configuration
  <nis_server>
    <domain>mydomain.de</domain>
    <maps_to_serve config:type="list">
      <nis_map>auto.master</nis_map>
      <nis_map>ethers</nis_map>
    </maps_to_serve>
    <merge_passwd config:type="boolean">false</merge_passwd>
    <mingid config:type="integer">0</mingid>
    <minuid config:type="integer">0</minuid>
    <nopush config:type="boolean">false</nopush>
    <pwd_chfn config:type="boolean">false</pwd_chfn>
    <pwd_chsh config:type="boolean">false</pwd_chsh>
    <pwd_srcdir>/etc</pwd_srcdir>
    <securenets config:type="list">
      <securenet>
        <netmask>255.0.0.0</netmask>
        <network>127.0.0.0</network>
      </securenet>
    </securenets>
    <server_type>master</server_type>
    <slaves config:type="list"/>
    <start_ypbind config:type="boolean">false</start_ypbind>
    <start_yppasswdd config:type="boolean">false</start_yppasswdd>
    <start_ypxfrd config:type="boolean">false</start_ypxfrd>
  </nis_server>

Attribute

Values

Description

domain

NIS domain name.

maps_to_serve

List of maps which are available for the server.

Values: auto.master, ethers, group, hosts, netgrp, networks, passwd, protocols, rpc, services, shadow

merge_passwd

Select if your passwd file should be merged with the shadow file (only possible if the shadow file exists).

Value: true/false

mingid

Minimum GID to include in the user maps.

minuid

Minimum UID to include in the user maps.

nopush

Do not push the changes to slave servers. (Useful if there are none).

Value: true/false

pwd_chfn

YPPWD_CHFN - allow changing the full name

Value: true/false

pwd_chsh

YPPWD_CHSH - allow changing the login shell

Value: true/false

pwd_srcdir

YPPWD_SRCDIR - source directory for passwd data

Default: /etc

securenets

List of allowed hosts to query the NIS server

A host address will be allowed if network is equal to the bitwise AND of the host's address and the netmask.

The entry with netmask 255.0.0.0 and network 127.0.0.0 must exist to allow connections from the local host.

Entering netmask 0.0.0.0 and network 0.0.0.0 gives access to all hosts.

server_type

Select whether to configure the NIS server as a master or a slave or not to configure a NIS server.

Values: master, slave, none

slaves

List of host names to configure as NIS server slaves.

start_ypbind

This host is also a NIS client (only when client is configured locally).

Value: true/false

start_yppasswdd

Also start the password daemon.

Value: true/false

start_ypxfrd

Also start the map transfer daemon. Fast Map distribution; it will speed up the transfer of maps to the slaves.

Value: true/false

4.14 Hosts Definition Edit source

Using the host resource, you can add more entries to the /etc/hosts file. Already existing entries will not be deleted. The following example shows details.

Example 4.41: /etc/hosts
    <host>
     <hosts config:type="list">
      <hosts_entry>
       <host_address>133.3.0.1</host_address>
       <names config:type="list">
        <name>booking</name>
       </names>
      </hosts_entry>
      <hosts_entry>
       <host_address>133.3.0.5</host_address>
       <names config:type="list">
        <name>test-machine</name>
       </names>
      </hosts_entry>
     </hosts>
    <host>

4.15 Windows Domain Membership Edit source

Using the samba-client resource, you can configure membership of a workgroup, NT domain, or Active Directory domain.

Example 4.42: Samba Client configuration
  <samba-client>
    <disable_dhcp_hostname config:type="boolean">true</disable_dhcp_hostname>
    <global>
      <security>domain</security>
      <usershare_allow_guests>No</usershare_allow_guests>
      <usershare_max_shares>100</usershare_max_shares>
      <workgroup>WORKGROUP</workgroup>
    </global>
    <winbind config:type="boolean">false</winbind>
  </samba-client>

Attribute

Values

Description

disable_dhcp_hostname

Do not allow DHCP to change the host name.

Value: true/false

global/security

Kind of authentication regime (domain technology or Active Directory server (ADS)).

Value: ADS/domain

global/usershare_allow_guests

Sharing guest access is allowed.

Value: No/Yes

global/usershare_max_shares

Max. number of shares from smb.conf.

0 means that shares are not enabled.

global/workgroup

Workgroup or domain name.

winbind

Using winbind.

Value: true/false

4.16 Samba Server Edit source

Configuration of a simple Samba server.

Example 4.43: Samba Server configuration
  <samba-server>
    <accounts config:type="list"/>
    <backend/>
    <config config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <name>global</name>
        <parameters>
          <security>domain</security>
          <usershare_allow_guests>No</usershare_allow_guests>
          <usershare_max_shares>100</usershare_max_shares>
          <workgroup>WORKGROUP</workgroup>
        </parameters>
      </listentry>
    </config>
    <service>Disabled</service>
    <trustdom/>
    <version>2.11</version>
  </samba-server>

Attribute

Values

Description

accounts

List of Samba accounts.

backend

List of available back-ends

Value: true/false

config

Setting additional user-defined parameters in /etc/samba/smb.conf.

The example shows parameters in the global section of /etc/samba/smb.conf.

service

Samba service starts during boot.

Value: Enabled/Disabled

trustdom/

Trusted Domains.

A map of two maps (keys: establish, revoke). Each map contains entries in the format key: domainname value: password.

version

Samba version.

Default: 2.11

4.17 Authentication Client Edit source

The configuration file must be in the JSON format. Verify that both autoyast2 and autoyast2-installation are installed. Use the Autoinstallation Configuration module in YaST to generate a valid JSON configuration file. Launch YaST and switch to the Miscellaneous › Autoinstallation Configuration. Choose Network Services › User Logon Management, click Edit, and configure the available settings. Click OK when done. To save the generated configuration file, use the File › Save.

Tip
Tip: Using ldaps://

To use LDAP with native SSL (rather than TLS), add the ldaps resource.

4.18 NFS Client and Server Edit source

Configuring a system as an NFS client or an NFS server can be done using the configuration system. The following examples show how both NFS client and server can be configured.

From openSUSE Leap 15.2 on, the structure of NFS client configuration has changed. Some global configuration options were introduced: enable_nfs4 to switch NFS4 support on/off and idmapd_domain to define domain name for rpc.idmapd (this only makes sense when NFS4 is enabled). Attention: the old structure is not compatible with the new one and the control files with an NFS section created on older releases will not work with newer products.

For more information on how to install openSUSE Leap onto NFS shares, refer to Section 4.4.9, “NFS Configuration”.

Example 4.44: Network Configuration: NFS Client
<nfs>
  <enable_nfs4 config:type="boolean">true</enable_nfs4>
  <idmapd_domain>suse.cz</idmapd_domain>
  <nfs_entries config:type="list">
    <nfs_entry>
      <mount_point>/home</mount_point>
      <nfs_options>sec=krb5i,intr,rw</nfs_options>
      <server_path>saurus.suse.cz:/home</server_path>
      <vfstype>nfs4</vfstype>
    </nfs_entry>
    <nfs_entry>
      <mount_point>/work</mount_point>
      <nfs_options>defaults</nfs_options>
      <server_path>bivoj.suse.cz:/work</server_path>
      <vfstype>nfs</vfstype>
    </nfs_entry>
    <nfs_entry>
      <mount_point>/mnt</mount_point>
      <nfs_options>defaults</nfs_options>
      <server_path>fallback.suse.cz:/srv/dist</server_path>
      <vfstype>nfs</vfstype>
    </nfs_entry>
  </nfs_entries>
</nfs>
Example 4.45: Network Configuration: NFS Server
<nfs_server>
  <nfs_exports config:type="list">
    <nfs_export>
      <allowed config:type="list">
        <allowed_clients>*(ro,root_squash,sync)</allowed_clients>
      </allowed>
      <mountpoint>/home</mountpoint>
    </nfs_export>
    <nfs_export>
      <allowed config:type="list">
        <allowed_clients>*(ro,root_squash,sync)</allowed_clients>
      </allowed>
      <mountpoint>/work</mountpoint>
    </nfs_export>
  </nfs_exports>
  <start_nfsserver config:type="boolean">true</start_nfsserver>
</nfs_server>

4.19 NTP Client Edit source

Important
Important: NTP Client Profile Incompatible

Starting with openSUSE Leap 15, the NTP client profile has a new format and is not compatible with previous profiles. You need to update your NTP client profile used in prior openSUSE Leap versions to be compatible with version 15 and newer.

Following is an example of the NTP client configuration:

Example 4.46: Network Configuration: NTP Client
<ntp-client>
<ntp_policy>auto</ntp_policy>1
 <ntp_servers config:type="list">
  <ntp_server>
   <address>cz.pool.ntp.org</address>2
   <iburst config:type="boolean">false</iburst>3
   <offline config:type="boolean">false</offline>4
  </ntp_server>
 </ntp_servers>
 <ntp_sync>15</ntp_sync>5
</ntp-client>

1

The ntp_policy takes the same values as the NETCONFIG_NTP_POLICY option in /etc/sysconfig/network/config. The most common options are 'static' and 'auto' (default). See man 8 netconfig for more details.

2

URL of the time server or pool of time servers.

3

iburst speeds up the initial time synchronization for the specific time source after chronyd is started.

4

When the offline option is set to true it will prevent the client from polling the time server if it is not available when chronyd is started. Polling will not resume until it is started manually with chronyc online. This command does not survive a reboot. Setting it to false ensures that clients will always attempt to contact the time server, without administrator intervention.

5

For ntp_sync, enter 'systemd' (default) when running an NTP daemon, an integer interval in seconds to synchronize using cron, or 'manual' for no automatic synchronization.

The following example illustrates an IPv6 configuration. You may use the server's IP address, host name, or both:

<peer>
  <address>2001:418:3ff::1:53</address>
  <comment/>
  <options/>
  <type>server</type>
</peer>

<peer>
  <address>2.pool.ntp.org</address>
  <comment/>
  <options/>
  <type>server</type>
</peer>

4.20 Mail Server Configuration Edit source

For the mail configuration of the client, this module lets you create a detailed mail configuration. The module contains various options. We recommended you use it at least for the initial configuration.

Example 4.47: Mail Configuration
<mail>
  <aliases config:type="list">
    <alias>
      <alias>root</alias>
      <comment></comment>
      <destinations>foo</destinations>
    </alias>
    <alias>
      <alias>test</alias>
      <comment></comment>
      <destinations>foo</destinations>
    </alias>
  </aliases>
  <connection_type config:type="symbol">permanent</connection_type>
  <fetchmail config:type="list">
    <fetchmail_entry>
      <local_user>foo</local_user>
      <password>bar</password>
      <protocol>POP3</protocol>
      <remote_user>foo</remote_user>
      <server>pop.foo.com</server>
    </fetchmail_entry>
    <fetchmail_entry>
      <local_user>test</local_user>
      <password>bar</password>
      <protocol>IMAP</protocol>
      <remote_user>test</remote_user>
      <server>blah.com</server>
    </fetchmail_entry>
  </fetchmail>
  <from_header>test.com</from_header>
  <listen_remote config:type="boolean">true</listen_remote>
  <local_domains config:type="list">
    <domains>test1.com</domains>
  </local_domains>
  <masquerade_other_domains config:type="list">
      <domain>blah.com</domain>
  </masquerade_other_domains>
  <masquerade_users config:type="list">
    <masquerade_user>
      <address>joe@test.com</address>
      <comment></comment>
      <user>joeuser</user>
    </masquerade_user>
    <masquerade_user>
      <address>bar@test.com</address>
      <comment></comment>
      <user>foo</user>
    </masquerade_user>
  </masquerade_users>
  <mta config:type="symbol">postfix</mta>
  <outgoing_mail_server>test.com</outgoing_mail_server>
  <postfix_mda config:type="symbol">local</postfix_mda>
  <smtp_auth config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <password>bar</password>
      <server>test.com</server>
      <user>foo</user>
    </listentry>
  </smtp_auth>
  <use_amavis config:type="boolean">true</use_amavis>
  <virtual_users config:type="list">
    <virtual_user>
      <alias>test.com</alias>
      <comment></comment>
      <destinations>foo.com</destinations>
    </virtual_user>
    <virtual_user>
      <alias>geek.com</alias>
      <comment></comment>
      <destinations>bar.com</destinations>
    </virtual_user>
  </virtual_users>
</mail>

4.21 Apache HTTP Server Configuration Edit source

This section is used for configuration of an Apache HTTP server.

For less experienced users, we would suggest to configure the Apache server using the HTTP server YaST module. After that, call the AutoYaST configuration module, select the HTTP server YaST module and clone the Apache settings. These settings can be exported via the menu File.

Example 4.48: HTTP Server Configuration
  <http-server>
    <Listen config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <ADDRESS/>
        <PORT>80</PORT>
      </listentry>
    </Listen>
    <hosts config:type="list">
      <hosts_entry>
        <KEY>main</KEY>
        <VALUE config:type="list">
          <listentry>
            <KEY>DocumentRoot</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            #
            # Global configuration that will be applicable for all
            # virtual hosts, unless deleted here or overriden elsewhere.
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>"/srv/www/htdocs"</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            #
            # Configure the DocumentRoot
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <SECTIONNAME>Directory</SECTIONNAME>
            <SECTIONPARAM>"/srv/www/htdocs"</SECTIONPARAM>
            <VALUE config:type="list">
              <listentry>
                <KEY>Options</KEY>
                <OVERHEAD>
                # Possible values for the Options directive are "None", "All",
                # or any combination of:
                #   Indexes Includes FollowSymLinks SymLinksifOwnerMatch
                #   ExecCGI MultiViews
                #
                # Note that "MultiViews" must be named *explicitly*
                # --- "Options All"
                # does not give it to you.
                #
                # The Options directive is both complicated and important.
                #  Please see
                #  http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/core.html#options
                # for more information.
                </OVERHEAD>
                <VALUE>None</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>AllowOverride</KEY>
                <OVERHEAD>
                # AllowOverride controls what directives may be placed in
                # .htaccess files. It can be "All", "None", or any combination
                # of the keywords:
                #   Options FileInfo AuthConfig Limit
                </OVERHEAD>
                <VALUE>None</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <OVERHEAD>
                # Controls who can get stuff from this server.
                </OVERHEAD>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>!mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Require</KEY>
                    <VALUE>all granted</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Order</KEY>
                    <VALUE>allow,deny</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Allow</KEY>
                    <VALUE>from all</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
            </VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>Alias</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # Aliases: aliases can be added as needed (with no limit).
            # The format is Alias fakename realname
            #
            # Note that if you include a trailing / on fakename then the
            # server will require it to be present in the URL.  So "/icons"
            # is not aliased in this example, only "/icons/".  If the fakename
            # is slash-terminated, then the realname must also be slash
            # terminated, and if the fakename omits the trailing slash, the
            # realname must also omit it.
            # We include the /icons/ alias for FancyIndexed directory listings.
            # If you do not use FancyIndexing, you may comment this out.
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>/icons/ "/usr/share/apache2/icons/"</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            </OVERHEAD>
            <SECTIONNAME>Directory</SECTIONNAME>
            <SECTIONPARAM>"/usr/share/apache2/icons"</SECTIONPARAM>
            <VALUE config:type="list">
              <listentry>
                <KEY>Options</KEY>
                <VALUE>Indexes MultiViews</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>AllowOverride</KEY>
                <VALUE>None</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>!mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Require</KEY>
                    <VALUE>all granted</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Order</KEY>
                    <VALUE>allow,deny</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Allow</KEY>
                    <VALUE>from all</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
            </VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>ScriptAlias</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # ScriptAlias: This controls which directories contain server
            # scripts. ScriptAliases are essentially the same as Aliases,
            # except that documents in the realname directory are treated
            # as applications and run by the server when requested rather
            # than as documents sent to the client.
            # The same rules about trailing "/" apply to ScriptAlias
            # directives as to Alias.
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>/cgi-bin/ "/srv/www/cgi-bin/"</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # "/srv/www/cgi-bin" should be changed to wherever your
            # ScriptAliased CGI directory exists, if you have that configured.
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <SECTIONNAME>Directory</SECTIONNAME>
            <SECTIONPARAM>"/srv/www/cgi-bin"</SECTIONPARAM>
            <VALUE config:type="list">
              <listentry>
                <KEY>AllowOverride</KEY>
                <VALUE>None</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>Options</KEY>
                <VALUE>+ExecCGI -Includes</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>!mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Require</KEY>
                    <VALUE>all granted</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
                <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
                <SECTIONPARAM>mod_access_compat.c</SECTIONPARAM>
                <VALUE config:type="list">
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Order</KEY>
                    <VALUE>allow,deny</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                  <listentry>
                    <KEY>Allow</KEY>
                    <VALUE>from all</VALUE>
                  </listentry>
                </VALUE>
              </listentry>
            </VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # UserDir: The name of the directory that is appended onto a
            # user's home directory if a ~user request is received.
            # To disable it, simply remove userdir from the list of modules
            # in APACHE_MODULES in /etc/sysconfig/apache2.
            #
            </OVERHEAD>
            <SECTIONNAME>IfModule</SECTIONNAME>
            <SECTIONPARAM>mod_userdir.c</SECTIONPARAM>
            <VALUE config:type="list">
              <listentry>
                <KEY>UserDir</KEY>
                <OVERHEAD>
                # Note that the name of the user directory ("public_html")
                # cannot simply be changed here, since it is a compile time
                # setting. The apache package would need to be rebuilt.
                # You could work around by deleting /usr/sbin/suexec, but
                # then all scripts from the directories would be executed
                # with the UID of the webserver.
                </OVERHEAD>
                <VALUE>public_html</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>Include</KEY>
                <OVERHEAD>
                # The actual configuration of the directory is in
                # /etc/apache2/mod_userdir.conf.
                </OVERHEAD>
                <VALUE>/etc/apache2/mod_userdir.conf</VALUE>
              </listentry>
            </VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>IncludeOptional</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # Include all *.conf files from /etc/apache2/conf.d/.
            #
            # This is mostly meant as a place for other RPM packages to drop
            # in their configuration snippet.
            #
            # 
            # You can comment this out here if you want those bits include
            # only in a certain virtual host, but not here.
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>/etc/apache2/conf.d/*.conf</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>IncludeOptional</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            # The manual... if it is installed ('?' means it will not complain)
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>/etc/apache2/conf.d/apache2-manual?conf</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>ServerName</KEY>
            <VALUE>linux-wtyj</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>ServerAdmin</KEY>
            <OVERHEAD>
            </OVERHEAD>
            <VALUE>root@linux-wtyj</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>NameVirtualHost</KEY>
            <VALUE>192.168.43.2</VALUE>
          </listentry>
        </VALUE>
      </hosts_entry>
      <hosts_entry>
        <KEY>192.168.43.2/secondserver.suse.de</KEY>
        <VALUE config:type="list">
          <listentry>
            <KEY>DocumentRoot</KEY>
            <VALUE>/srv/www/htdocs</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>ServerName</KEY>
            <VALUE>secondserver.suse.de</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>ServerAdmin</KEY>
            <VALUE>second_server@suse.de</VALUE>
          </listentry>
          <listentry>
            <KEY>_SECTION</KEY>
            <SECTIONNAME>Directory</SECTIONNAME>
            <SECTIONPARAM>/srv/www/htdocs</SECTIONPARAM>
            <VALUE config:type="list">
              <listentry>
                <KEY>AllowOverride</KEY>
                <VALUE>None</VALUE>
              </listentry>
              <listentry>
                <KEY>Require</KEY>
                <VALUE>all granted</VALUE>
              </listentry>
            </VALUE>
          </listentry>
        </VALUE>
      </hosts_entry>
    </hosts>
    <modules config:type="list">
      <module_entry>
        <change>enable</change>
        <name>socache_shmcb</name>
        <userdefined config:type="boolean">true</userdefined>
      </module_entry>
      <module_entry>
        <change>enable</change>
        <name>reqtimeout</name>
        <userdefined config:type="boolean">true</userdefined>
      </module_entry>
      <module_entry>
        <change>enable</change>
        <name>authn_core</name>
        <userdefined config:type="boolean">true</userdefined>
      </module_entry>
      <module_entry>
        <change>enable</change>
        <name>authz_core</name>
        <userdefined config:type="boolean">true</userdefined>
      </module_entry>
    </modules>
    <service config:type="boolean">true</service>
    <version>2.9</version>
  </http-server>

List Name

List Elements

Description

Listen

List of host Listen settings

PORT

port address

ADDRESS

Network address. All addresses will be taken if this entry is empty.

hosts

List of Hosts configuration

KEY

Host name; <KEY>main</KEY> defines the main hosts, for example <KEY>192.168.43.2/secondserver.suse.de</KEY>

VALUE

List of different values describing the host.

modules

Module list. Only user-defined modules need to be described.

name

Module name

userdefined

For historical reasons, it is always set to true.

change

For historical reasons, it is always set to enable.

Element

Description

Comment

version

Version of used Apache server

Only for information. Default 2.9

service

Enable Apache service

Optional. Default: false

Note
Note: Firewall

To run an Apache server correctly, make sure the firewall is configured appropriately.

4.22 Squid Server Edit source

Squid is a caching and forwarding Web proxy.

Example 4.49: Squid Server Configuration
  <squid>
    <acls config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <name>QUERY</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>cgi-bin \?</option>
        </options>
        <type>urlpath_regex</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>apache</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>Server</option>
          <option>^Apache</option>
        </options>
        <type>rep_header</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>all</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0</option>
        </options>
        <type>src</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>manager</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>cache_object</option>
        </options>
        <type>proto</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>localhost</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>127.0.0.1/255.255.255.255</option>
        </options>
        <type>src</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>to_localhost</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>127.0.0.0/8</option>
        </options>
        <type>dst</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>SSL_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>443</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>80</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>21</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>443</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>70</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>210</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>1025-65535</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>280</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>488</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>591</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>Safe_ports</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>777</option>
        </options>
        <type>port</type>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <name>CONNECT</name>
        <options config:type="list">
          <option>CONNECT</option>
        </options>
        <type>method</type>
      </listentry>
    </acls>
    <http_accesses config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>manager</listentry>
          <listentry>localhost</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">true</allow>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>manager</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">false</allow>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>!Safe_ports</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">false</allow>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>CONNECT</listentry>
          <listentry>!SSL_ports</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">false</allow>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>localhost</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">true</allow>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <acl config:type="list">
          <listentry>all</listentry>
        </acl>
        <allow config:type="boolean">false</allow>
      </listentry>
    </http_accesses>
    <http_ports config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <host/>
        <port>3128</port>
        <transparent config:type="boolean">false</transparent>
      </listentry>
    </http_ports>
    <refresh_patterns config:type="list">
      <listentry>
        <case_sensitive config:type="boolean">true</case_sensitive>
        <max>10080</max>
        <min>1440</min>
        <percent>20</percent>
        <regexp>^ftp:</regexp>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <case_sensitive config:type="boolean">true</case_sensitive>
        <max>1440</max>
        <min>1440</min>
        <percent>0</percent>
        <regexp>^gopher:</regexp>
      </listentry>
      <listentry>
        <case_sensitive config:type="boolean">true</case_sensitive>
        <max>4320</max>
        <min>0</min>
        <percent>20</percent>
        <regexp>.</regexp>
      </listentry>
    </refresh_patterns>
    <service_enabled_on_startup config:type="boolean">true</service_enabled_on_startup>
    <settings>
      <access_log config:type="list">
        <listentry>/var/log/squid/access.log</listentry>
      </access_log>
      <cache_dir config:type="list">
        <listentry>ufs</listentry>
        <listentry>/var/cache/squid</listentry>
        <listentry>100</listentry>
        <listentry>16</listentry>
        <listentry>256</listentry>
      </cache_dir>
      <cache_log config:type="list">
        <listentry>/var/log/squid/cache.log</listentry>
      </cache_log>
      <cache_mem config:type="list">
        <listentry>8</listentry>
        <listentry>MB</listentry>
      </cache_mem>
      <cache_mgr config:type="list">
        <listentry>webmaster</listentry>
      </cache_mgr>
      <cache_replacement_policy config:type="list">
        <listentry>lru</listentry>
      </cache_replacement_policy>
      <cache_store_log config:type="list">
        <listentry>/var/log/squid/store.log</listentry>
      </cache_store_log>
      <cache_swap_high config:type="list">
        <listentry>95</listentry>
      </cache_swap_high>
      <cache_swap_low config:type="list">
        <listentry>90</listentry>
      </cache_swap_low>
      <client_lifetime config:type="list">
        <listentry>1</listentry>
        <listentry>days</listentry>
      </client_lifetime>
      <connect_timeout config:type="list">
        <listentry>2</listentry>
        <listentry>minutes</listentry>
      </connect_timeout>
      <emulate_httpd_log config:type="list">
        <listentry>off</listentry>
      </emulate_httpd_log>
      <error_directory config:type="list">
        <listentry/>
      </error_directory>
      <ftp_passive config:type="list">
        <listentry>on</listentry>
      </ftp_passive>
      <maximum_object_size config:type="list">
        <listentry>4096</listentry>
        <listentry>KB</listentry>
      </maximum_object_size>
      <memory_replacement_policy config:type="list">
        <listentry>lru</listentry>
      </memory_replacement_policy>
      <minimum_object_size config:type="list">
        <listentry>0</listentry>
        <listentry>KB</listentry>
      </minimum_object_size>
    </settings>
  </squid>

Attribute

Values

Description

acls

List of Access Control Settings (ACLs).

Each list entry contains the name, type, and additional options. Use the YaST Squid configuration module to get an overview of possible entries.

http_accesses

In the Access Control table, access can be denied or allowed to ACL Groups.

If there are more ACL Groups in one definition, access will be allowed or denied to members who belong to all ACL Groups at the same time.

The Access Control table is checked in the order listed here. The first matching entry is used.

http_ports

Define all ports where Squid will listen for clients' HTTP requests.

Host can contain a host name or IP address or remain empty.

transparent disables PMTU discovery when transparent.

refresh_patterns

Refresh patterns define how Squid treats the objects in the cache.

The refresh patterns are checked in the order listed here. The first matching entry is used.

Min determines how long (in minutes) an object should be considered fresh if no explicit expiry time is given. Max is the upper limit of how long objects without an explicit expiry time will be considered fresh. Percent is the percentage of the object's age (time since last modification). An object without an explicit expiry time will be considered fresh.

settings

Map of all available general parameters with default values.

Use the YaST Squid configuration module to get an overview about possible entries.

service_enabled_on_startup

Squid service start when booting.

Value: true/false

4.23 FTP Server Edit source

Configure your FTP Internet server settings.

Example 4.50: FTP server configuration:
  <ftp-server>
    <AnonAuthen>2</AnonAuthen>
    <AnonCreatDirs>NO</AnonCreatDirs>
    <AnonMaxRate>0</AnonMaxRate>
    <AnonReadOnly>NO</AnonReadOnly>
    <AntiWarez>YES</AntiWarez>
    <Banner>Welcome message</Banner>
    <CertFile/>
    <ChrootEnable>NO</ChrootEnable>
    <EnableUpload>YES</EnableUpload>
    <FTPUser>ftp</FTPUser>
    <FtpDirAnon>/srv/ftp</FtpDirAnon>
    <FtpDirLocal/>
    <GuestUser/>
    <LocalMaxRate>0</LocalMaxRate>
    <MaxClientsNumber>10</MaxClientsNumber>
    <MaxClientsPerIP>3</MaxClientsPerIP>
    <MaxIdleTime>15</MaxIdleTime>
    <PasMaxPort>40500</PasMaxPort>
    <PasMinPort>40000</PasMinPort>
    <PassiveMode>YES</PassiveMode>
    <SSL>0</SSL>
    <SSLEnable>NO</SSLEnable>
    <SSLv2>NO</SSLv2>
    <SSLv3>NO</SSLv3>
    <StartDaemon>2</StartDaemon>
    <TLS>YES</TLS>
    <Umask/>
    <UmaskAnon/>
    <UmaskLocal/>
    <VerboseLogging>NO</VerboseLogging>
    <VirtualUser>NO</VirtualUser>
  </ftp-server>

Element

Description

Comment

AnonAuthen

Enable/disable anonymous and local users.

Authenticated Users Only: 1; Anonymous Only: 0; Both: 2

AnonCreatDirs

Anonymous users can create directories.

Values: YES/NO

AnonReadOnly

Anonymous users can upload.

Values: YES/NO

AnonMaxRate

The maximum data transfer rate permitted for anonymous clients.

KB/s

AntiWarez

Disallow downloading of files that were uploaded but not validated by a local admin.

Values: YES/NO

Banner

Specify the name of a file containing the text to display when someone connects to the server.

CertFile

DSA certificate to use for SSL-encrypted connections

This option specifies the location of the DSA certificate to use for SSL-encrypted connections.

ChrootEnable

When enabled, local users will by default be placed in a chroot jail in their home directory after login.

Warning: This option has security implications. Values: YES/NO

EnableUpload

If enabled, FTP users can upload.

To allow anonymous users to upload, enable AnonReadOnly. Values: YES/NO

FTPUser

Defines the anonymous FTP user.

FtpDirAnon

FTP directory for anonymous users.

Specify a directory which is used for anonymous FTP users.

FtpDirLocal

FTP directory for authenticated users.

Specify a directory which is used for FTP authenticated users.

LocalMaxRate

The maximum data transfer rate permitted for local authenticated users.

KB/s

MaxClientsNumber

The maximum number of clients allowed to connect.

MaxClientsPerIP

Defines the maximum number of clients for one IP.

This limits the number of clients allowed to connect from a single source Internet address.

MaxIdleTime

The maximum time (timeout) a remote client may wait between FTP commands.

Minutes

PasMaxPort

Maximum value for a port range for passive connection replies.

PassiveMode needs to be set to YES.

PasMinPort

Minimum value for a port range for passive connection replies.

PassiveMode needs to be set to YES.

PassiveMode

Enable Passive Mode

Value: YES/NO

SSL

Security Settings

Disable SSL/TLS: 0; Accept SSL and TLS: 1; Refuse Connections Without SSL/TLS: 2

SSLEnable

If enabled, SSL connections are allowed.

Value: YES/NO

SSLv2

If enabled, SSL version 2 connections are allowed.

Value: YES/NO

SSLv3

If enabled, SSL version 3 connections are allowed.

Value: YES/NO

StartDaemon

How the FTP daemon will be started.

Manually: 0; when booting: 1; via systemd socket: 2

TLS

If enabled, TLS connections are allowed.

Value: YES/NO

Umask

File creation mask, in the format (umask for files):(umask for directories).

For example 177:077 if you feel paranoid.

UmaskAnon

The value to which the umask for file creation is set for anonymous users.

To specify octal values, remember the "0" prefix, otherwise the value will be treated as a base-10 integer.

UmaskLocal

Umask for authenticated users.

To specify octal values, remember the "0" prefix, otherwise the value will be treated as a base-10 integer.

VerboseLogging

When enabled, all FTP requests and responses are logged.

Value: YES/NO

VirtualUser

By using virtual users, FTP accounts can be administrated without affecting system accounts.

Value: YES/NO

Note
Note: Firewall

Proper Firewall setting will be required for the FTP server to run correctly.

4.24 TFTP Server Edit source

Configure your TFTP Internet server settings.

Use this to enable a server for TFTP (trivial file transfer protocol). The server will be started using the systemd socket.

Note that TFTP and FTP are not the same.

Example 4.51: TFTP server configuration:
  <tftp-server>
    <start_tftpd config:type="boolean">true</start_tftpd>
    <tftp_directory>/tftpboot</tftp_directory>
  </tftp-server>

Element

Description

Comment

start_tftpd

Enabling TFTP server service.

Value: true/false

tftp_directory

Boot Image Directory: Specify the directory where served files are located.

The usual value is /tftpboot. The directory will be created if it does not exist. The server uses this as its root directory (using the -s option).

4.25 Firstboot Workflow Edit source

The YaST firstboot utility (YaST Initial System Configuration), which runs after the installation is completed, lets you configure the freshly installed system. On the first boot after the installation, users are guided through a series of steps that allow for easier configuration of a system. YaST firstboot does not run by default and needs to be configured to run.

Example 4.52: Enabling Firstboot Workflow
      <firstboot>
        <firstboot_enabled config:type="boolean">true</firstboot_enabled>
      </firstboot>

4.26 Security Settings Edit source

Using the features of this module, you can to change the local security settings on the target system. The local security settings include the boot configuration, login settings, password settings, user addition settings, and file permissions.

Configuring the security settings automatically is similar to the Custom Settings in the security module available in the running system. This allows you create a customized configuration.

Example 4.53: Security configuration

See the reference for the meaning and the possible values of the settings in the following example.

<security>
  <console_shutdown>ignore</console_shutdown>
  <displaymanager_remote_access>no</displaymanager_remote_access>
  <fail_delay>3</fail_delay>
  <faillog_enab>yes</faillog_enab>
  <gid_max>60000</gid_max>
  <gid_min>101</gid_min>
  <gdm_shutdown>root</gdm_shutdown>
  <lastlog_enab>yes</lastlog_enab>
  <encryption>md5</encryption>
  <obscure_checks_enab>no</obscure_checks_enab>
  <pass_max_days>99999</pass_max_days>
  <pass_max_len>8</pass_max_len>
  <pass_min_days>1</pass_min_days>
  <pass_min_len>6</pass_min_len>
  <pass_warn_age>14</pass_warn_age>
  <passwd_use_cracklib>yes</passwd_use_cracklib>
  <permission_security>secure</permission_security>
  <run_updatedb_as>nobody</run_updatedb_as>
  <uid_max>60000</uid_max>
  <uid_min>500</uid_min>
</security>

4.26.1 Password Settings Options Edit source

Change various password settings. These settings are mainly stored in the /etc/login.defs file.

Use this resource to activate one of the encryption methods currently supported. If not set, DES is configured.

DES, the Linux default method, works in all network environments, but it restricts you to passwords no longer than eight characters. MD5 allows longer passwords, thus provides more security, but some network protocols do not support this, and you may have problems with NIS. Blowfish is also supported.

Additionally, you can set up the system to check for password plausibility and length etc.

4.26.2 Boot Settings Edit source

Use the security resource, to change various boot settings.

How to interpret CtrlAltDel?

When someone at the console has pressed the CtrlAltDel key combination, the system usually reboots. Sometimes it is desirable to ignore this event, for example, when the system serves as both workstation and server.

Shutdown behavior of GDM

Configure a list of users allowed to shut down the machine from GDM.

4.26.3 Login Settings Edit source

Change various login settings. These settings are mainly stored in the /etc/login.defs file.

4.26.4 New user settings (useradd settings) Edit source

Set the minimum and maximum possible user and group IDs.

4.27 Linux Audit Framework (LAF) Edit source

This module allows the configuration of the audit daemon and to add rules for the audit subsystem.

Example 4.54: LAF configuration
  <audit-laf>
    <auditd>
      <flush>INCREMENTAL</flush>
      <freq>20</freq>
      <log_file>/var/log/audit/audit.log</log_file>
      <log_format>RAW</log_format>
      <max_log_file>5</max_log_file>
      <max_log_file_action>ROTATE</max_log_file_action>
      <name_format>NONE</name_format>
      <num_logs>4</num_logs>
    </auditd>
    <rules/>
  </audit-laf>

Attribute

Values

Description

auditd/flush

Describes how to write the data to disk.

If set to INCREMENTAL the Frequency parameter tells how many records to write before issuing an explicit flush to disk. NONE means: no special effort is made to flush data, DATA: keep data portion synchronized, SYNC: keep data and metadata fully synchronized.

auditd/freq

This parameter tells how many records to write before issuing an explicit flush to disk.

The parameter flush needs to be set to INCREMENTAL.

auditd/log_file

The full path name to the log file.

auditd/log_fomat

How much information needs to be logged.

Set RAW to log all data (store in a format exactly as the kernel sends it) or NOLOG to discard all audit information instead of writing it to disk (does not affect data sent to the dispatcher).

auditd/max_log_file

How much information needs to be logged.

Unit: Megabytes

auditd/num_logs

Number of log files.

max_log_file_action needs to be set to ROTATE

auditd/max_log_file_action

What happens if the log capacity has been reached.

If the action is set to ROTATE the Number of Log Files specifies the number of files to keep. Set to SYSLOG, the audit daemon will write a warning to the system log. With SUSPEND the daemon stops writing records to disk. IGNORE means do nothing, KEEP_LOGS is similar to ROTATE, but log files are not overwritten.

auditd/name_format

Computer Name Format describes how to write the computer name to the log file.

If USER is set, the user-defined name is used. NONE means no computer name is inserted. HOSTNAME uses the name returned by the 'gethostname' syscall. FQD uses the fully qualified domain name.

rules

Rules for auditctl

You can edit the rules manually, which we only recommend for advanced users. For more information about all options, see man auditctl.

4.28 Users and Groups Edit source

4.28.1 Users Edit source

A list of users can be defined in the <users> section. To be able to log in, make sure that either the root users are set up or rootpassword is specified as a linuxrc option.

Example 4.55: Minimal User Configuration
<users config:type="list">
  <user>
    <username>root</username>
    <user_password>password</user_password>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
  </user>
    <user>
    <username>tux</username>
    <user_password>password</user_password>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
  </user>
</users>

The following example shows a more complex scenario. System-wide default settings from /etc/default/useradd, such as the shell or the parent directory for the home directory, are applied.

Example 4.56: Complex User Configuration
<users config:type="list">
  <user>
    <username>root</username>
    <user_password>password</user_password>
    <uid>1001</uid>
    <gid>100</gid>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
    <fullname>Root User</fullname>
    <authorized_keys config:type="list">
      <listentry>command="/opt/login.sh" ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAADAQABAAABAQDKLt1vnW2vTJpBp3VK91rFsBvpY97NljsVLdgUrlPbZ/L51FerQQ+djQ/ivDASQjO+567nMGqfYGFA/De1EGMMEoeShza67qjNi14L1HBGgVojaNajMR/NI2d1kDyvsgRy7D7FT5UGGUNT0dlcSD3b85zwgHeYLidgcGIoKeRi7HpVDOOTyhwUv4sq3ubrPCWARgPeOLdVFa9clC8PTZdxSeKp4jpNjIHEyREPin2Un1luCIPWrOYyym7aRJEPopCEqBA9HvfwpbuwBI5F0uIWZgSQLfpwW86599fBo/PvMDa96DpxH1VlzJlAIHQsMkMHbsCazPNC0++Kp5ZVERiH root@example.net</listentry>
    </authorized_keys>
  </user>
  <user>
    <username>tux</username>
    <user_password>password</user_password>
    <uid>1002</uid>
    <gid>100</gid>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
    <fullname>Plain User</fullname>
    <home>/Users/plain</home>
    <password_settings>
      <max>120</max>
      <inact>5</inact>
    </password_settings>
  </user>
</users>
Note
Note: authorized_keys File Will Be Overwritten

If the profile defines a set of SSH authorized keys for a user in the authorized_keys section, an existing $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys file will be overwritten. If not existing, the file will be created with the content specified. Avoid overwriting an existing authorized_keys file by not specifying the respective section in the AutoYaST control file.

Note
Note: Combine rootpassword and Root User Options

It is possible to specify rootpassword in linuxrc and have a user section for the root user. If this section is missing the password, then the password from linuxrc will be used. Passwords in profiles take precedence over linuxrc passwords.

Note
Note: Specifying a User ID (uid)

Each user on a Linux system has a numeric user ID. You can either specify such a user ID within the AutoYaST control file manually by using uid, or let the system automatically choose a user ID by not using uid.

User IDs should be unique throughout the system. If not, some applications such as the login manager gdm may no longer work as expected.

When adding users with the AutoYaST control file, it is strongly recommended not to mix user-defined IDs and automatically provided IDs. When doing so, unique IDs cannot be guaranteed. Either specify IDs for all users added with the AutoYaST control file or let the system choose the ID for all users.

Attribute

Values

Description

username

Text

<username>lukesw</username>

Required. It should be a valid user name. Check man 8 useradd if you are not sure.

fullname

Text

<fullname>Tux Torvalds</fullname>

Optional. User's full name.

forename

Text

<forname>Tux</forename>

Optional. User's forename.

surname

Text

<surname>Skywalker</surname>

Optional. User's surname.

uid

Number

<uid>1001</uid>

Optional. User ID. It should be a unique and must be a non-negative number. If not specified, AutoYaST will automatically choose a user ID. Also refer to Note: Specifying a User ID (uid) for additional information.

gid

Number

<gid>100</gid>

Optional. Initial group ID. It must be a unique and non-negative number. Moreover it must refer to an existing group.

home

Path

<home>/home/luke</home>

Optional. Absolute path to the user's home directory. By default, /home/username will be used (for example, alice's home directory will be /home/alice).

home_btrfs_subvolume

Boolean

<home_btrfs_subvolume config:type="boolean">true</home_btrfs_subvolume>

Optional. Generates the home directory in a Btrfs subvolume. Disabled by default.

shell

Path

<shell>/usr/bin/zsh</shell>

Optional. /bin/bash is the default value. If you choose another one, make sure that it is installed (adding the corresponding package to the software section).

user_password

Text

<user_password>some-password</user_password>

Optional. If you enter an exclamation mark (!), a random password will be generated. A user's password can be written in plain text (not recommended) or in encrypted form. To create an encrypted password, use mkpasswd. Enter the password as written in /etc/shadow (second column). To enable or disable the use of encrypted passwords in the profile, see the encrypted parameter.

encrypted

Boolean

<encrypted config:type="boolean">true</encrypted>

Optional. Considered false if not present. Indicates if the user's password in the profile is encrypted or not. AutoYaST supports standard encryption algorithms (see man 3 crypt).

password_settings

Password settings

<password_settings>
  <expire/>
  <max>60</max>
  <warn>7</warn>
</password_settings>

Optional. Some password settings can be customized: expire (account expiration date in format YYYY-MM-DD), flag (/etc/shadow flag), inact (number of days after password expiration that account is disabled), max (maximum number of days a password is valid), min (grace period in days until which a user can change password after it has expired) and warn (number of days before expiration when the password change reminder starts).

authorized_keys

List of authorized keys

<authorized_keys config:type="list">
  <listentry>ssh-rsa ...</listentry>
</authorized_keys>

A list of authorized keys to be written to $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys. See example below.

4.28.2 User Defaults Edit source

The profile can specify a set of default values for new users like password expiration, initial group, home directory prefix, etc. Besides using them as default values for the users that are defined in the profile, AutoYaST will write those settings to /etc/default/useradd to be read for useradd.

Attribute

Values

Description

group

Text

<group>100</group>

Optional. Default initial login group.

groups

Text

<groups>users</groups>

Optional. List of additional groups.

home

Path

<home>/home</home>

Optional. User's home directory prefix.

expire

Date

<expire>2017-12-31</expire>

Optional. Default password expiration date in YYYY-MM-DD format.

inactive

Number

<inactive>3</inactive>

Optional. Number of days after which an expired account is disabled.

no_groups

Boolean

<no_groups config:type="boolean">true</no_groups>

Optional. Do not use secondary groups.

shell

Path

<shell>/usr/bin/fish</shell>

Default login shell. /bin/bash is the default value. If you choose another one, make sure that it is installed (adding the corresponding package to the software section).

skel

Path

<skel>/etc/skel</skel>

Optional. Location of the files to be used as skeleton when adding a new user. You can find more information in man 8 useradd.

umask

File creation mode mask

<umask>022</umask>

Set the file creation mode mask for the home directory. By default useradd will use 022. Check man 8 useradd and man 1 umask for further information.

4.28.3 Groups Edit source

A list of groups can be defined in <groups> as shown in the example.

Example 4.57: Group Configuration
<groups config:type="list">
  <group>
    <gid>100</gid>
    <groupname>users</groupname>
    <userlist>bob,alice</userlist>
  </group>
</groups>

Attribute

Values

Description

groupname

Text

<groupname>users</groupname>

Required. It should be a valid group name. Check man 8 groupadd if you are not sure.

gid

Number

<gid>100</gid>

Optional. Group ID. It must be a unique and non-negative number.

group_password

Text

<group_password>password</group_password>

Optional. The group's password can be written in plain text (not recommended) or in encrypted form. Check the encrypted to select the desired behavior.

encrypted

Boolean

<encrypted config:type="boolean">true</encrypted>

Optional. Indicates if the group's password in the profile is encrypted or not.

userlist

Users list

<userlist>bob,alice</userlist>

Optional. A list of users who belong to the group. User names must be separated by commas.

4.28.4 Login Settings Edit source

Two special login settings can be enabled through an AutoYaST profile: autologin and password-less login. Both of them are disabled by default.

Example 4.58: Enabling autologin and password-less login
<login_settings>
  <autologin_user>vagrant</autologin_user>
  <password_less_login config:type="boolean">true</password_less_login>
</login_settings>

Attribute

Values

Description

password_less_login

Boolean

<password_less_login config:type="boolean">true</password_less_login>

Optional. Enables password-less login. It only affects graphical login.

autologin_user

Text

<autologin_user>alice</autologin_user>

Optional. Enables autologin for the given user.

4.29 Custom User Scripts Edit source

By adding scripts to the auto-installation process you can customize the installation according to your needs and take control in different stages of the installation.

In the auto-installation process, five types of scripts can be executed at different points in time during the installation:

All scripts need to be in the <scripts> section.

  • pre-scripts (very early, before anything else really happens)

  • postpartitioning-scripts (after partitioning and mounting to /mnt but before RPM installation)

  • chroot-scripts (after the package installation, before the first boot)

  • post-scripts (during the first boot of the installed system, no services running)

  • init-scripts (during the first boot of the installed system, all services up and running)

4.29.1 Pre-Install Scripts Edit source

Executed before YaST does any real change to the system (before partitioning and package installation but after the hardware detection).

You can use a pre-script to modify your control file and let AutoYaST reread it. Find your control file in /tmp/profile/autoinst.xml. Adjust the file and store the modified version in /tmp/profile/modified.xml. AutoYaST will read the modified file after the pre-script finishes.

It is also possible to modify the storage devices in your pre-scripts. For example, you can create new partitions or change the configuration of certain technologies like multipath. AutoYaST always inspects the storage devices again after executing all the pre-install scripts.

Note
Note: Pre-Install Scripts with Confirmation

Pre-scripts are executed at an early stage of the installation. This means if you have requested to confirm the installation, the pre-scripts will be executed before the confirmation screen shows up (profile/install/general/mode/confirm).

Note
Note: Pre-Install and Zypper

To call zypper in the pre-install script you will need to set the environment variable ZYPP_LOCKFILE_ROOT="/var/run/autoyast" to prevent conflicts with the running YaST process.

Pre-Install Script elements must be placed as follows:

<scripts>
  <pre-scripts config:type="list">
    <script>
      ...
    </script>
  </pre-scripts>
</scripts>

4.29.2 Post-partitioning Scripts Edit source

Executed after YaST has done the partitioning and written /etc/fstab. The empty system is already mounted to /mnt.

Post-partitioning script elements must be placed as follows:

<scripts>
  <postpartitioning-scripts config:type="list">
    <script>
      ...
    </script>
  </postpartitioning-scripts>
</scripts>

4.29.3 Chroot Environment Scripts Edit source

Chroot scripts are executed before the machine reboots for the first time. You can execute chroot scripts before the installation chroots into the installed system and configures the boot loader or you can execute a script after the chroot into the installed system has happened (look at the chrooted parameter for that).

Chroot Environment script elements must be placed as follows:

<scripts>
  <chroot-scripts config:type="list">
    <script>
      ...
    </script>
  </chroot-scripts>
</scripts>

4.29.4 Post-Install Scripts Edit source

These scripts are executed after AutoYaST has completed the system configuration and after it has booted the system for the first time.

Post-install script elements must be placed as follows:

<scripts>
    <post-scripts config:type="list">
      <script>
        ...
      </script>
    </post-scripts>
  </scripts>

4.29.5 Init Scripts Edit source

These scripts are executed when YaST has finished, during the initial boot process after the network has been initialized. These final scripts are executed using /usr/lib/YaST2/bin/autoyast-initscripts.sh and are executed only once. Init scripts are configured using the tag init-scripts.

The following elements must be between the <scripts><init-scripts config:type="list"><script> ... </script></init-scripts>...</scripts> tags

Table 4.1: Init script XML representation

Element

Description

Comment

location

Define a location from where the script gets fetched. Locations can be the same as for the profile (HTTP, FTP, NFS, etc.).

<location
>http://10.10.0.1/myInitScript.sh</location>

Either <location> or <source> must be defined.

source

The script itself (source code), encapsulated in a CDATA tag. If you do not want to put the whole shell script into the XML profile, use the location parameter.

<source>
<![CDATA[
echo "Testing the init script" >
/tmp/init_out.txt
]]>
</source>

Either <location> or <source> must be defined.

filename

The file name of the script. It will be stored in a temporary directory under /tmp

<filename>mynitScript5.sh</filename>

Optional in case you only have a single init script. The default name (init-scripts) is used in this case. If having specified more than one init script, you must set a unique name for each script.

rerun

Normally, a script is only run once, even if you use ayast_setup to run an XML file multiple times. Change this default behavior by setting this boolean to true.

<rerun config:type="boolean">true</rerun>

Optional. Default is false (scripts only run once).

When added to the control file manually, scripts need to be included in a CDATA element to avoid confusion with the file syntax and other tags defined in the control file.

4.29.6 Script XML Representation Edit source

The XML elements described below can be used for all the script types described above, except for the chrooted element, which can only be used in chroot scripts.

Table 4.2: Script XML Representation

Element

Description

Comment

location

Define a location from where the script gets fetched. Locations can be the same as for the control file (HTTP, FTP, NFS, etc.).

<location
>http://10.10.0.1/myPreScript.sh</location>

Either location or source must be defined.

source

The script itself (source code), encapsulated in a CDATA tag. If you do not want to put the whole shell script into the XML control file, refer to the location parameter.

<source>
<![CDATA[
echo "Testing the pre script" > /tmp/pre-script_out.txt
]]>
</source>

Either location or source must be defined.

interpreter

Specify the interpreter that must be used for the script. Supported options are shell and perl.

<interpreter>perl</interpreter>

Optional; default is shell.

file name

The file name of the script. It will be stored in a temporary directory under /tmp.

<filename>myPreScript5.sh</filename>

Optional; default is the type of the script (pre-scripts in this case). If you have more than one script, you should define different names for each script.

feedback

If this boolean is true, output and error messages of the script (STDOUT and STDERR) will be shown in a pop-up. The user needs to confirm them via the OK button.

<feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>

Optional; default is false.

feedback_type

This can be message, warning or error. Set the timeout for these pop-ups in the <report> section.

<feedback_type>warning</feedback_type>

Optional; if missing, an always-blocking pop-up is used.

debug

If this is true, every single line of a shell script is logged. Perl scripts are run with warnings turned on.

<debug config:type="boolean">true</debug>

Optional; default is true.

notification

This text will be shown in a pop-up for the time the script is running in the background.

<notification>Please wait while script is running...</notification>

Optional; if not configured, no notification pop-up will be shown.

param-list

It is possible to specify parameters given to the script being called. You may have more than one param entry. They are concatenated by a single space character on the script command line. If any shell quoting should be necessary (for example to protect embedded spaces) you need to include this.

<param-list config:type="list">
  <param>par1</param>
  <param>par2 par3</param>
  <param>"par4.1 par4.2"</param>
</param-list>

Optional; if not configured, no parameters get passed to script.

rerun

A script is only run once. Even if you use ayast_setup to run an XML file multiple times, the script is only run once. Change this default behavior by setting this boolean to true.

<rerun config:type="boolean">true</rerun>

Optional; default is false, meaning that scripts only run once.

chrooted

During installation, the new system is mounted at /mnt. If this parameter is set to false, AutoYaST does not run chroot and does not install the boot loader at this stage. If the parameter is set to true, AutoYaST performs a chroot into /mnt and installs the boot loader. The result is that to change anything in the newly-installed system, you no longer need to use the /mnt prefix.

<chrooted config:type="boolean"
>true</chrooted>

Optional; default is false. This option is only available for chroot environment scripts.

4.29.7 Script Example Edit source

Example 4.59: Script Configuration
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE profile>
<profile xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns" xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
<scripts>
  <chroot-scripts config:type="list">
    <script>
      <chrooted config:type="boolean">true</chrooted>
      <filename>chroot.sh</filename>
      <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
      <source><![CDATA[
#!/bin/sh
echo "Testing chroot (chrooted) scripts"
ls
]]>
      </source>
    </script>
    <script>
      <filename>chroot.sh</filename>
        <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
        <source><![CDATA[
#!/bin/sh
echo "Testing chroot scripts"
df
cd /mnt
ls
]]>
        </source>
      </script>
    </chroot-scripts>
    <post-scripts config:type="list">
      <script>
        <filename>post.sh</filename>
        <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
        <source><![CDATA[
#!/bin/sh

echo "Running Post-install script"
systemctl start portmap
mount -a 192.168.1.1:/local /mnt
cp /mnt/test.sh /tmp
umount /mnt
]]>
        </source>
      </script>
      <script>
        <filename>post.pl</filename>
        <interpreter>perl</interpreter>
        <source><![CDATA[
#!/usr/bin/perl
print "Running Post-install script";

]]>
        </source>
      </script>
    </post-scripts>
    <pre-scripts config:type="list">
      <script>
        <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
        <location>http://192.168.1.1/profiles/scripts/prescripts.sh</location>
      </script>
      <script>
        <filename>pre.sh</filename>
        <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
        <source><![CDATA[
#!/bin/sh
echo "Running pre-install script"
]]>
        </source>
      </script>
    </pre-scripts>
    <postpartitioning-scripts config:type="list">
      <script>
        <filename>postpart.sh</filename>
        <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
        <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
        <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
        <source><![CDATA[
touch /mnt/testfile
echo Hi
]]>
        </source>
      </script>
    </postpartitioning-scripts>
  </scripts>
</profile>

After installation is finished, the scripts and the output logs can be found in the directory /var/adm/autoinstall. The scripts are located in the subdirectory scripts and the output logs in the log directory.

The log consists of the output produced when executing the shell scripts using the following command:

/bin/sh -x SCRIPT_NAME 2&>/var/adm/autoinstall/logs/SCRIPT_NAME.log

4.30 System Variables (Sysconfig) Edit source

Using the sysconfig resource, it is possible to define configuration variables in the sysconfig repository (/etc/sysconfig) directly. Sysconfig variables, offer the possibility to fine-tune many system components and environment variables exactly to your needs.

The following example shows how a variable can be set using the sysconfig resource.

Example 4.60: Sysconfig Configuration
<sysconfig config:type="list" >
  <sysconfig_entry>
    <sysconfig_key>XNTPD_INITIAL_NTPDATE</sysconfig_key>
    <sysconfig_path>/etc/sysconfig/xntp</sysconfig_path>
    <sysconfig_value>ntp.host.com</sysconfig_value>
  </sysconfig_entry>
  <sysconfig_entry>
    <sysconfig_key>HTTP_PROXY</sysconfig_key>
    <sysconfig_path>/etc/sysconfig/proxy</sysconfig_path>
    <sysconfig_value>proxy.host.com:3128</sysconfig_value>
  </sysconfig_entry>
  <sysconfig_entry>
    <sysconfig_key>FTP_PROXY</sysconfig_key>
    <sysconfig_path>/etc/sysconfig/proxy</sysconfig_path>
    <sysconfig_value>proxy.host.com:3128</sysconfig_value>
  </sysconfig_entry>
</sysconfig>

Both relative and absolute paths can be provided. If no absolute path is given, it is treated as a sysconfig file under the /etc/sysconfig directory.

4.31 Adding Complete Configurations Edit source

For many applications and services you may have a configuration file which should be copied to the appropriate location on the installed system. For example, if you are installing a Web server, you may have a server configuration file (httpd.conf).

Using this resource, you can embed the file into the control file by specifying the final path on the installed system. YaST will copy this file to the specified location.

This feature requires the autoyast2 package to be installed. If the package is missing, AutoYaST will automatically install the package if it is missing.

You can specify the file_location where the file should be retrieved from. This can also be a location on the network such as an HTTP server: <file_location>http://my.server.site/issue</file_location>.

You can create directories by specifying a file_path that ends with a slash.

Example 4.61: Dumping files into the installed system
<files config:type="list">
  <file>
    <file_path>/etc/apache2/httpd.conf</file_path>
    <file_contents>

<![CDATA[
some content
]]>

    </file_contents>
  </file>
  <file>
    <file_path>/mydir/a/b/c/</file_path> <!-- create directory -->
  </file>
</files>

A more advanced example is shown below. This configuration will create a file using the content supplied in file_contents and change the permissions and ownership of the file. After the file has been copied to the system, a script is executed. This can be used to modify the file and prepare it for the client's environment.

Example 4.62: Dumping files into the installed system
<files config:type="list">
  <file>
    <file_path>/etc/someconf.conf</file_path>
    <file_contents>

<![CDATA[
some content
]]>

    </file_contents>
    <file_owner>tux.users</file_owner>
    <file_permissions>444</file_permissions>
    <file_script>
      <interpreter>shell</interpreter>
      <source>

<![CDATA[
#!/bin/sh

echo "Testing file scripts" >> /etc/someconf.conf
df
cd /mnt
ls
]]>

      </source>
    </file_script>
  </file>
</files>

4.32 Ask the User for Values during Installation Edit source

You have the option to let the user decide the values of specific parts of the control file during the installation. If you use this feature, a pop-up will ask the user to enter a specific part of the control file during installation. If you want a full auto installation, but the user should set the password of the local account, you can do this via the ask directive in the control file.

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      ...
    </ask>
  </ask-list>
</general>
Table 4.3: Ask the User for Values: XML representation

Element

Description

Comment

question

The question you want to ask the user.

<question>Enter the LDAP server</question>

The default value is the path to the element (the path often looks strange, so we recommend entering a question).

default

Set a preselection for the user. A text entry will be filled out with this value. A check box will be true or false and a selection will have the given value preselected.

<default>dc=suse,dc=de</default>

Optional.

help

An optional help text that is shown on the left side of the question.

<help>Enter the LDAP server address.</help>

Optional.

title

An optional title that is shown above the questions.

<title>LDAP server</title>

Optional.

type

The type of the element you want to change. Possible values are symbol, boolean, string and integer. The file system in the partition section is a symbol, while the encrypted element in the user configuration is a boolean. You can see the type of that element if you look in your control file at the config:type="...." attribute. You can also use static_text as type. A static_text is a text that does not require any user input and can show information not included in the help text.

<type>symbol</type>

Optional. The default is string. If type is symbol, you must provide the selection element too (see below).

password

If this boolean is set to true, a password dialog pops up instead of a simple text entry. Setting this to true only makes sense if type is string.

<password config:type="boolean">true</password>

Optional. The default is false.

pathlist

A list of path elements. A path is a comma separated list of elements that describes the path to the element you want to change. For example, the LDAP server element can be found in the control file in the <ldap><ldap_server> section. So to change that value, you need to set the path to ldap,ldap_server.

<pathlist config:type="list">
  <path>networking,dns,hostname</path>
  <path>...</path>
</pathlist>

To change the password of the first user in the control file, you need to set the path to users,0,user_password. The 0 indicates the first user in the <users config:type="list"> list of users in the control file. 1 would be the second one, and so on.

<users config:type="list">
  <user>
    <username>root</username>
    <user_password>password to change</user_password>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
  </user>
  <user>
    <username>tux</username>
    <user_password>password to change</user_password>
    <encrypted config:type="boolean">false</encrypted>
  </user>
</users>

This information is optional but you should at least provide path or file.

file

You can store the answer to a question in a file, to use it in one of your scripts later. If you ask during stage=initial and you want to use the answer in stage 2, then you need to copy the answer-file in a chroot script that is running as chrooted=false. Use the command: cp /tmp/my_answer /mnt/tmp/. The reason is that /tmp in stage 1 is in the RAM disk and will be lost after the reboot, but the installed system is already mounted at /mnt/.

<file>/tmp/answer_hostname</file>

This information is optional, but you should at least provide path or file.

stage

Stage configures the installation stage in which the question pops up. You can set this value to cont or initial. initial means the pop-up comes up very early in the installation, shortly after the pre-script has run. cont means, that the dialog with the question comes after the first reboot when the system boots for the very first time. Questions you answer during the initial stage will write their answer into the control file on the hard disk. You should know that if you enter clear text passwords during initial. Of course it does not make sense to ask for the file system to use during the cont phase. The hard disk is already partitioned at that stage and the question will have no effect.

<stage>cont</stage>

Optional. The default is initial.

selection

The selection element contains a list of entry elements. Each entry represents a possible option for the user to choose. The user cannot enter a value in a text box, but they can choose from a list of values.

<selection config:type="list">
  <entry>
    <value>
        btrfs
    </value>
    <label>
        Btrfs File System
    </label>
  </entry>
  <entry>
    <value>
        ext3
    </value>
    <label>
        Extended3 File System
    </label>
  </entry>
</selection>

Optional for type=string, not possible for type=boolean and mandatory for type=symbol.

dialog

You can ask more than one question per dialog. To do so, specify the dialog-id with an integer. All questions with the same dialog-id belong to the same dialog. The dialogs are sorted by the id too.

<dialog config:type="integer">3</dialog>

Optional.

element

You can have more than one question per dialog. To make that possible you need to specify the element-id with an integer. The questions in a dialog are sorted by ID.

<element config:type="integer">1</element>

Optional (see dialog).

width

You can increase the default width of the dialog. If there are multiple width specifications per dialog, the largest one is used. The number is roughly equivalent to the number of characters.

<width config:type="integer">50</width>

Optional.

height

You can increase the default height of the dialog. If there are multiple height specifications per dialog, the largest one is used. The number is roughly equivalent to the number of lines.

<height config:type="integer">15</height>

Optional.

frametitle

You can have more than one question per dialog. Each question on a dialog has a frame that can have a frame title, a small caption for each question. You can put multiple elements into one frame. They need to have the same frame title.

<frametitle>User data</frametitle>

Optional; default is no frame title.

script

You can run scripts after a question has been answered. See the table below for detailed instructions about scripts.

<script>...</script>

Optional; default is no script.

ok_label

You can change the label on the Ok button. The last element that specifies the label for a dialog wins.

<ok_label>Finish</ok_label>

Optional.

back_label

You can change the label on the Back button. The last element that specifies the label for a dialog wins.

<back_label>change values</back_label>

Optional.

timeout

You can specify an integer here that is used as timeout in seconds. If the user does not answer the question before the timeout, the default value is taken as answer. When the user touches or changes any widget in the dialog, the timeout is turned off and the dialog needs to be confirmed via Ok.

<timeout config:type="integer">30</timeout>

Optional; a missing value is interpreted as 0, which means that there is no timeout.

default_value_script

You can run scripts to set the default value for a question (see Section 4.32.1, “Default Value Scripts” for detailed instructions about default value scripts). This feature is useful if you can calculate a default value, especially in combination with the timeout option.

<default_value_script>...</default_value_script>

Optional; default is no script.

4.32.1 Default Value Scripts Edit source

You can run scripts to set the default value for a question. This feature is useful if you can calculate a default value, especially in combination with the timeout option.

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      <default_value_script>
        ...
      </default_value_script>
    </ask>
  </ask-list>
</general>
Table 4.4: Default Value Scripts: XML representation

Element

Description

Comment

source

The source code of the script. Whatever you echo to STDOUT will be used as default value for the ask-dialog. If your script has an exit code other than 0, the normal default element is used. Take care you use echo -n to suppress the \n and that you echo reasonable values and not okay for a boolean

<source>...</source>

This value is required, otherwise nothing would be executed.

interpreter

The interpreter to use.

<interpreter>perl</interpreter>

The default value is shell. You can also set /bin/myinterpreter as value.

4.32.2 Scripts Edit source

You can run scripts after a question has been answered.

The elements listed below must be placed within the following XML structure:

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      <script>
        ...
      </script>
    </ask>
  </ask-list>
</general>
Table 4.5: Scripts: XML representation

Element

Description

Comment

file name

The file name of the script.

<filename>my_ask_script.sh</filename>

The default is ask_script.sh

source

The source code of the script. Together with rerun_on_error activated, you check the value that was entered for sanity. Your script can create a file /tmp/next_dialog with a dialog id specifying the next dialog AutoYaST will raise. A value of -1 terminates the ask sequence. If that file is not created, AutoYaST will run the dialogs in the normal order (since 11.0 only).

<source>...</source>

This value is required, otherwise nothing would be executed.

environment

A boolean that passes the value of the answer to the question as an environment variable to the script. The variable is named VAL.

<environment config:type="boolean">true</environment>

Optional. Default is false.

feedback

A boolean that turns on feedback for the script execution. STDOUT will be displayed in a pop-up window that must be confirmed after the script execution.

<feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>

Optional, default is false.

debug

A boolean that turns on debugging for the script execution.

<debug config:type="boolean">true</debug>

Optional, default is true. This value needs feedback to be turned on, too.

rerun_on_error

A boolean that keeps the dialog open until the script has an exit code of 0 (zero). So you can parse and check the answers the user gave in the script and display an error with the feedback option.

<rerun_on_error config:type="boolean">true</rerun_on_error>

Optional, default is false. This value should be used together with the feedback option.

Below you can see an example of the usage of the ask feature.

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      <pathlist config:type="list">
        <path>ldap,ldap_server</path>
      </pathlist>
      <stage>cont</stage>
      <help>Choose your server depending on your department</help>
      <selection config:type="list">
        <entry>
          <value>ldap1.mydom.de</value>
          <label>LDAP for development</label>
        </entry>
        <entry>
          <value>ldap2.mydom.de</value>
          <label>LDAP for sales</label>
        </entry>
      </selection>
      <default>ldap2.mydom.de</default>
      <default_value_script>
        <source> <![CDATA[
echo -n "ldap1.mydom.de"
]]>
        </source>
      </default_value_script>
    </ask>
    <ask>
      <pathlist config:type="list">
        <path>networking,dns,hostname</path>
      </pathlist>
      <question>Enter Hostname</question>
      <stage>initial</stage>
      <default>enter your hostname here</default>
    </ask>
    <ask>
      <pathlist config:type="list">
        <path>partitioning,0,partitions,0,filesystem</path>
      </pathlist>
      <question>File System</question>
      <type>symbol</type>
      <selection config:type="list">
        <entry>
          <value config:type="symbol">ext4</value>
          <label>default File System (recommended)</label>
        </entry>
        <entry>
          <value config:type="symbol">ext3</value>
          <label>Fallback File System</label>
        </entry>
      </selection>
    </ask>
  </ask-list>
</general>

The following example shows a to choose between AutoYaST control files. AutoYaST will read the modified.xml file again after the ask-dialogs are done. This way you can fetch a complete new control file.

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      <selection config:type="list">
        <entry>
          <value>part1.xml</value>
          <label>Simple partitioning</label>
        </entry>
        <entry>
          <value>part2.xml</value>
          <label>encrypted /tmp</label>
        </entry>
        <entry>
          <value>part3.xml</value>
          <label>LVM</label>
        </entry>
      </selection>
      <title>XML Profile</title>
      <question>Choose a profile</question>
      <stage>initial</stage>
      <default>part1.xml</default>
      <script>
        <filename>fetch.sh</filename>
        <environment config:type="boolean">true</environment>
        <source>
<![CDATA[
wget http://10.10.0.162/$VAL -O /tmp/profile/modified.xml 2>/dev/null
]]>
        </source>
        <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
        <feedback config:type="boolean">false</feedback>
      </script>
    </ask>tion>
  </ask-list>
</general>

You can verify the answer of a question with a script like this:

<general>
  <ask-list config:type="list">
    <ask>
      <script>
        <filename>my.sh</filename>
        <rerun_on_error config:type="boolean">true</rerun_on_error>
        <environment config:type="boolean">true</environment>
        <source><![CDATA[
if [ "$VAL" = "myhost" ]; then
    echo "Illegal Hostname!";
    exit 1;
fi
exit 0
]]>
        </source>
        <debug config:type="boolean">false</debug>
        <feedback config:type="boolean">true</feedback>
      </script>
      <dialog config:type="integer">0</dialog>
      <element config:type="integer">0</element>
      <pathlist config:type="list">
        <path>networking,dns,hostname</path>
      </pathlist>
      <question>Enter Hostname</question>
      <default>enter your hostname here</default>
    </ask>
  </ask-list>
</general>

4.33 Kernel Dumps Edit source

With Kdump the system can create crashdump files if the whole kernel crashes. Crash dump files contain the memory contents while the system crashed. Such core files can be analyzed later by support or a (kernel) developer to find the reason for the system crash. Kdump is mostly useful for servers where you cannot easily reproduce such crashes but it is important to get the problem fixed.

There is a downside to this. Enabling Kdump requires between 64 MB and 128 MB of additional system RAM reserved for Kdump in case the system crashes and the dump needs to be generated.

This section only describes how to set up Kdump with AutoYaST. It does not describe how Kdump works. For details, refer to the kdump(7) manual page.

The following example shows a general Kdump configuration.

Example 4.63: Kdump configuration
<kdump>
  <!-- memory reservation -->
  <add_crash_kernel config:type="boolean">true</add_crash_kernel>
  <crash_kernel>256M-:64M</crash_kernel>
  <general>

    <!-- dump target settings -->
    <KDUMP_SAVEDIR>ftp://stravinsky.suse.de/incoming/dumps</KDUMP_SAVEDIR>
    <KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL>true</KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL>
    <KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE>64</KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE>
    <KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS>5</KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS>

    <!-- filtering and compression -->
    <KDUMP_DUMPFORMAT>compressed</KDUMP_DUMPFORMAT>
    <KDUMP_DUMPLEVEL>1</KDUMP_DUMPLEVEL>

    <!-- notification -->
    <KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO>tux@example.com</KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO>
    <KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC>spam@example.com devnull@example.com</KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC>
    <KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER>mail.example.com</KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER>
    <KDUMP_SMTP_USER></KDUMP_SMTP_USER>
    <KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD></KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD>

    <!-- kdump kernel -->
    <KDUMP_KERNELVER></KDUMP_KERNELVER>
    <KDUMP_COMMANDLINE></KDUMP_COMMANDLINE>
    <KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND></KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND>

    <!-- expert settings -->
    <KDUMP_IMMEDIATE_REBOOT>yes</KDUMP_IMMEDIATE_REBOOT>
    <KDUMP_VERBOSE>15</KDUMP_VERBOSE>
    <KEXEC_OPTIONS></KEXEC_OPTIONS>
  </general>
</kdump>

4.33.1 Memory Reservation Edit source

The first step is to reserve memory for Kdump at boot-up. Because the memory must be reserved very early during the boot process, the configuration is done via a kernel command line parameter called crashkernel. The reserved memory will be used to load a second kernel which will be executed without rebooting if the first kernel crashes. This second kernel has a special initrd, which contains all programs necessary to save the dump over the network or to disk, send a notification e-mail, and finally reboot.

To reserve memory for Kdump, specify the amount (such as 64M to reserve 64 MB of memory from the RAM) and the offset. The syntax is crashkernel=AMOUNT@OFFSET. The kernel can auto-detect the right offset (except for the Xen hypervisor, where you need to specify 16M as offset). The amount of memory that needs to be reserved depends on architecture and main memory. Refer to Book “System Analysis and Tuning Guide”, Chapter 17 “Kexec and Kdump”, Section 17.7.1 “Manual Kdump Configuration” for recommendations on the amount of memory to reserve for Kdump.

You can also use the extended command line syntax to specify the amount of reserved memory depending on the System RAM. That is useful if you share one AutoYaST control file for multiple installations or if you often remove or install memory on one machine. The syntax is:

BEGIN_RANGE_1-END_RANGE_1:AMOUNT_1,BEGIN_RANGE_2-END_RANGE_2:AMOUNT_2@OFFSET

BEGIN_RANGE_1 is the start of the first memory range (for example: 0M) and END_RANGE_1 is the end of the first memory range (can be empty in case infinity should be assumed) and so on. For example, 256M-2G:64M,2G-:128M reserves 64 MB of crashkernel memory if the system has between 256 MB and 2 GB RAM and reserves 128 MB of crashkernel memory if the system has more than 2 GB RAM.

On the other hand, it is possible to specify multiple values for the crashkernel parameter. For example, when you need to reserve different segments of low and high memory, use values like 72M,low and 256M,high:

Example 4.64: Kdump memory reservation with multiple values
<kdump>
  <!-- memory reservation (high and low) -->
  <add_crash_kernel config:type="boolean">true</add_crash_kernel>
  <crash_kernel config:type="list">
    <listentry>72M,low</listentry>
    <listentry>256M,high</listentry>
  </crash_kernel>
</kdump>

The following table shows the settings necessary to reserve memory:

Table 4.6: Kdump Memory Reservation Settings:XML Representation

Element

Description

Comment

add_crash_kernel

Set to true if memory should be reserved and Kdump enabled.

<add_crash_kernel config:type="boolean">true</add_crash_kernel>

required

crash_kernel

Use the syntax of the crashkernel command line as discussed above.

<crash_kernel>256M:64M</crash_kernel>

A list of values is also supported.

<crash_kernel config:type="list">
  <listentry>72M,low</listentry>
  <listentry>256M,high</listentry>
</crash_kernel>

required

4.33.2 Dump Saving Edit source

This section describes where and how crash dumps will be stored.

4.33.2.1 Target Edit source

The element KDUMP_SAVEDIR specifies the URL to where the dump is saved. The following methods are possible:

  • file to save to the local disk,

  • ftp to save to an FTP server (without encryption),

  • sftp to save to an SSH2 SFTP server,

  • nfs to save to an NFS location and

  • cifs to save the dump to a CIFS/SMP export from Samba or Microsoft Windows.

For details see the kdump(5) manual page. Two examples are: file:///var/crash (which is the default location according to FHS) and ftp://user:password@host:port/incoming/dumps. A subdirectory, with the time stamp contained in the name, will be created and the dumps saved there.

When the dump is saved to the local disk, KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS can be used to delete old dumps automatically. Set it to the number of old dumps that should be kept. If the target partition would end up with less free disk space than specified in KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE, the dump is not saved.

To save the whole kernel and the debug information (if installed) to the same directory, set KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL to true. You will have everything you need to analyze the dump in one directory (except kernel modules and their debugging information).

4.33.2.2 Filtering and Compression Edit source

The kernel dump is uncompressed and unfiltered. It can get as large as your system RAM. To get smaller files, compress the dump file afterward. The dump needs to be decompressed before opening.

To use page compression, which compresses every page and allows dynamic decompression with the crash(8) debugging tool, set KDUMP_DUMPFORMAT to compressed (default).

You may not want to save all memory pages, for example those filled with zeroes. To filter the dump, set the KDUMP_DUMPLEVEL. 0 produces a full dump and 31 is the smallest dump. The manual pages kdump(5) and makedumpfile(8) list for each value which pages will be saved.

4.33.2.3 Summary Edit source

Table 4.7: Dump Target Settings: XML Representation

Element

Description

Comment

KDUMP_SAVEDIR

A URL that specifies the target to which the dump and related files will be saved.

<KDUMP_SAVEDIR>file:///var/crash/</KDUMP_SAVEDIR>

required

KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL

Set to true, if not only the dump should be saved to KDUMP_SAVEDIR but also the kernel and its debugging information (if installed).

<KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL>false</KDUMP_COPY_KERNEL>

optional

KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE

Disk space in megabytes that must remain free after saving the dump. If not enough space is available, the dump will not be saved.

<KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE>64</KDUMP_FREE_DISK_SIZE>

optional

KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS

The number of dumps that are kept (not deleted) if KDUMP_SAVEDIR points to a local directory. Specify 0 if you do not want any dumps to be automatically deleted, specify -1 if all dumps except the current one should be deleted.

<KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS>4</KDUMP_KEEP_OLD_DUMPS>

optional

4.33.3 E-Mail Notification Edit source

Configure e-mail notification to be informed when a machine crashes and a dump is saved.

Because Kdump runs in the initrd, a local mail server cannot send the notification e-mail. An SMTP server needs to be specified (see below).

You need to provide exactly one address in KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO. More addresses can be specified in KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC. Only use e-mail addresses in both cases, not a real name.

Specify KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER and (if the server needs authentication) KDUMP_SMTP_USER and KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD. Support for TLS/SSL is not available but may be added in the future.

Table 4.8: E-Mail Notification Settings: XML Representation

Element

Description

Comment

KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO

Exactly one e-mail address to which the e-mail should be sent. Additional recipients can be specified in KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC.

<KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO
>tux@example.com</KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_TO>

optional (notification disabled if empty)

KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC

Zero, one or more recipients that are in the cc line of the notification e-mail.

<KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC
>wilber@example.com geeko@example.com</KDUMP_NOTIFICATION_CC>

optional

KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER

Host name of the SMTP server used for mail delivery. SMTP authentication is supported (see KDUMP_SMTP_USER and KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD) but TLS/SSL are not.

<KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER>email.suse.de</KDUMP_SMTP_SERVER>

optional (notification disabled if empty)

KDUMP_SMTP_USER

User name used together with KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD for SMTP authentication.

<KDUMP_SMTP_USER>bwalle</KDUMP_SMTP_USER>

optional

KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD

Password used together with KDUMP_SMTP_USER for SMTP authentication.

<KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD>geheim</KDUMP_SMTP_PASSWORD>

optional

4.33.4 Kdump Kernel Settings Edit source

As already mentioned, a special kernel is booted to save the dump. If you do not want to use the auto-detection mechanism to find out which kernel is used (see the kdump(5) manual page that describes the algorithm which is used to find the kernel), you can specify the version of a custom kernel in KDUMP_KERNELVER. If you set it to foo, then the kernel located in /boot/vmlinuz-foo or /boot/vmlinux-foo (in that order on platforms that have a vmlinuz file) will be used.

You can specify the command line used to boot the Kdump kernel. Normally the boot command line is used, minus settings that are not relevant for Kdump (like the crashkernel parameter) plus some settings needed by Kdump (see the manual page kdump(5)). To specify additional parameters, use KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND. If you know what you are doing and you want to specify the entire command line, set KDUMP_COMMANDLINE.

Table 4.9: Kernel Settings: XML Representation

Element

Description

Comment

KDUMP_KERNELVER

Version string for the kernel used for Kdump. Leave it empty to use the auto-detection mechanism (strongly recommended).

<KDUMP_KERNELVER
>2.6.27-default</KDUMP_KERNELVER>

optional (auto-detection if empty)

KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND

Additional command line parameters for the Kdump kernel.

<KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND
>console=ttyS0,57600</KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND>

optional

KDUMP_Command Line

Overwrite the automatically generated Kdump command line. Use with care. Usually, KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND should suffice.

<KDUMP_COMMANDLINE_APPEND
>root=/dev/sda5 maxcpus=1 irqpoll</KDUMP_COMMANDLINE>

optional

4.33.5 Expert Settings Edit source

Table 4.10: Expert Settings: XML Representations

Element

Description

Comment

KDUMP_IMMEDIATE_REBOOT

true if the system should be rebooted automatically after the dump has been saved, false otherwise. The default is to reboot the system automatically.

<KDUMP_IMMEDIATE_REBOOT
>true</KDUMP_IMMEDIATE_REBOOT>

optional

KDUMP_VERBOSE

Bitmask that specifies how verbose the Kdump process should be. Read kdump(5) for details.

<KDUMP_VERBOSE>3</KDUMP_VERBOSE>

optional

KEXEC_OPTIONS

Additional options that are passed to kexec when loading the Kdump kernel. Normally empty.

<KEXEC_OPTIONS>--noio</KEXEC_OPTIONS>

optional

4.34 DNS Server Edit source

The Bind DNS server can be configured by adding a dns-server resource. The three more straightforward properties of that resource can have a value of 1 to enable them or 0 to disable.

Attribute

Value

Description

chroot

0 / 1

The DNS server must be jailed in a chroot.

start_service

0 / 1

Bind is enabled (executed on system start).

use_ldap

0 / 1

Store the settings in LDAP instead of native configuration files.

Example 4.65: Basic DNS server settings
<dns-server>
  <chroot>0</chroot>
  <start_service>1</start_service>
  <use_ldap>0</use_ldap>
</dns-server>

In addition to those basic settings, there are three properties of type list that can be used to fine-tune the service configuration.

List

Description

logging

Options of the DNS server logging.

options

Bind options like the files and directories to use, the list of forwarders and other configuration settings.

zones

List of DNS zones known by the server, including all the settings, records and SOA records.

Example 4.66: Configuring DNS server zones and advanced settings
<dns-server>
  <logging config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <key>channel</key>
      <value>log_syslog { syslog; }</value>
    </listentry>
  </logging>
  <options config:type="list">
    <option>
      <key>forwarders</key>
      <value>{ 10.10.0.1; }</value>
    </option>
  </options>
  <zones config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <is_new>1</is_new>
      <modified>1</modified>
      <options config:type="list"/>
      <records config:type="list">
        <listentry>
          <key>mydom.uwe.</key>
          <type>MX</type>
          <value>0 mail.mydom.uwe.</value>
        </listentry>
        <listentry>
          <key>mydom.uwe.</key>
          <type>NS</type>
          <value>ns.mydom.uwe.</value>
        </listentry>
      </records>
      <soa>
        <expiry>1w</expiry>
        <mail>root.aaa.aaa.cc.</mail>
        <minimum>1d</minimum>
        <refresh>3h</refresh>
        <retry>1h</retry>
        <serial>2005082300</serial>
        <server>aaa.aaa.cc.</server>
        <zone>@</zone>
      </soa>
      <soa_modified>1</soa_modified>
      <ttl>2d</ttl>
      <type>master</type>
      <update_actions config:type="list">
        <listentry>
          <key>mydom.uwe.</key>
          <operation>add</operation>
          <type>NS</type>
          <value>ns.mydom.uwe.</value>
        </listentry>
      </update_actions>
      <zone>mydom.uwe</zone>
    </listentry>
  </zones>
</dns-server>

4.35 DHCP Server Edit source

The dhcp-server resource makes it possible to configure all the settings of a DHCP server by means of the six following properties.

Element

Value

Description

chroot

0 / 1

A value of 1 means that the DHCP server must be jailed in a chroot.

start_service

0 / 1

Set this to 1 to enable the DHCP server (that is, run it on system startup).

use_ldap

0 / 1

If set to 1, the settings will be stored in LDAP instead of native configuration files.

other_options

Text

String with parameters that will be passed to the DHCP server executable when started. For example, use "-p 1234" to listen on a non-standard 1234 port. For all possible options, consult the dhcpd manual page. If left blank, default values will be used.

allowed_interfaces

List

List of network cards in which the DHCP server will be operating. See the example below for the exact format.

settings

List

List of settings to configure the behavior of the DHCP server. The configuration is defined in a tree-like structure where the root represents the global options, with subnets and host nested from there. The children, parent_id and parent_type properties are used to represent that nesting. See the example below for the exact format.

Example 4.67: Example dhcp-server section
<dhcp-server>
  <allowed_interfaces config:type="list">
    <allowed_interface>eth0</allowed_interface>
  </allowed_interfaces>
  <chroot>0</chroot>
  <other_options>-p 9000</other_options>
  <start_service>1</start_service>
  <use_ldap>0</use_ldap>

  <settings config:type="list">
    <settings_entry>
      <children config:type="list"/>
      <directives config:type="list">
        <listentry>
          <key>fixed-address</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>192.168.0.10</value>
        </listentry>
        <listentry>
          <key>hardware</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>ethernet d4:00:00:bf:00:00</value>
        </listentry>
      </directives>
      <id>static10</id>
      <options config:type="list"/>
      <parent_id>192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0</parent_id>
      <parent_type>subnet</parent_type>
      <type>host</type>
    </settings_entry>
    <settings_entry>
      <children config:type="list">
        <child>
          <id>static10</id>
          <type>host</type>
        </child>
      </children>
      <directives config:type="list">
        <listentry>
          <key>range</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>dynamic-bootp 192.168.0.100 192.168.0.150</value>
        </listentry>
        <listentry>
          <key>default-lease-time</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>14400</value>
        </listentry>
        <listentry>
          <key>max-lease-time</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>86400</value>
        </listentry>
      </directives>
      <id>192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0</id>
      <options config:type="list"/>
      <parent_id/>
      <parent_type/>
      <type>subnet</type>
    </settings_entry>
    <settings_entry>
      <children config:type="list">
        <child>
          <id>192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0</id>
          <type>subnet</type>
        </child>
      </children>
      <directives config:type="list">
        <listentry>
          <key>ddns-update-style</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>none</value>
        </listentry>
        <listentry>
          <key>default-lease-time</key>
          <type>directive</type>
          <value>14400</value>
        </listentry>
      </directives>
      <id/>
      <options config:type="list"/>
      <parent_id/>
      <parent_type/>
      <type/>
    </settings_entry>
  </settings>
</dhcp-server>

4.36 Firewall Configuration Edit source

SuSEfirewall2 has been replaced by firewalld starting with openSUSE Leap 15.0. Profiles using SuSEfirewall2 properties will be translated to firewalld profiles. However, not all profile properties can be converted. For details about firewalld, refer to Book “Security Guide”, Chapter 18 “Masquerading and Firewalls”, Section 18.4 “firewalld.

Important
Important: Limited Backward Compatibility with SuSEFirewall2 Based Profiles

The use of SuSEFirewall2 based profiles will be only partially supported as many options are not valid in firewalld and some missing configuration could affect your network security.

4.36.1 General Firewall Configuration Edit source

In firewalld the general configuration only exposes a few properties and most of the configuration is done by zones.

Attribute

Value

Description

start_firewall

Boolean

Whether firewalld should be started right after applying the configuration.

enable_firewall

Boolean

Whether firewalld should be started on every system startup.

default_zone

Zone name

The default zone is used for everything that is not explicitly assigned.

log_denied_packets

Type of dropped packages to be logged

Enable logging of dropped packages for the type selected. Values: off, unicast, multicast, broadcast, all.

name

Identifier of zone

Used to identify a zone. If the zone is not known yet, a new zone will be created.

short

Short summary of zone

Briefly summarizes the purpose of the zone. Ignored for already existing zones. If not specified, the name is used.

description

Description of zone

Describes the purpose of the zone. Ignored for already existing zones. If not specified, the name is used.

target

Default action

Defines the default action in the zone if no rule matches. Possible values are ACCEPT, %%REJECT%%, DROP and default. If not specified, default is used. For details about values, see https://firewalld.org/documentation/zone/options.html.

4.36.2 Firewall Zones Configuration Edit source

The configuration of firewalld is based on the existence of several zones which define the trust level for a connection, interface or source address. The behavior of each zone can be tweaked in several ways although not all the properties are exposed yet.

Attributes

Value

Description

interfaces

List of interface names

List of interface names assigned to this zone. Interfaces or sources can only be part of one zone.

services

List of services

List of services accessible in this zone.

ports

List of ports

List of single ports or ranges to be opened in the assigned zone.

protocols

List of protocols

List of protocols to be opened or be accessible in the assigned zone.

masquerade

Enable masquerade

It will enable or disable network address translation (NAT) in the assigned zone.

4.36.3 A Full Example Edit source

A full example of the firewall section, including general and zone specific properties could look like this.

Example 4.68: Example firewall section
<firewall>
  <enable_firewall>true</enable_firewall>
  <log_denied_packets>all</log_denied_packets>
  <default_zone>external</default_zone>
  <zones config:type="list">
    <zone>
      <name>public</name>
      <interfaces config:type="list">
        <interface>eth0</interface>
      </interfaces>
      <services config:type="list">
        <service>ssh</service>
        <service>dhcp</service>
        <service>dhcpv6</service>
        <service>samba</service>
        <service>vnc-server</service>
      </services>
      <ports config:type="list">
        <port>21/udp</port>
        <port>22/udp</port>
        <port>80/tcp</port>
        <port>443/tcp</port>
        <port>8080/tcp</port>
      </ports>
    </zone>
    <zone>
      <name>dmz</name>
      <interfaces config:type="list">
        <interface>eth1</interface>
      </interfaces>
    </zone>
  </zones>
</firewall>

4.37 Miscellaneous Hardware and System Components Edit source

In addition to the core component configuration, like network authentication and security, AutoYaST offers a wide range of hardware and system configuration options, the same as available by default on any system installed manually and in an interactive way. For example, it is possible to configure printers, sound devices, TV cards and any other hardware components which have a module within YaST.

Any new configuration options added to YaST will be automatically available in AutoYaST.

4.37.1 Printer Edit source

AutoYaST support for printing is limited to basic settings defining how CUPS is used on a client for printing via the network.

There is no AutoYaST support for setting up local print queues. Modern printers are usually connected via USB. CUPS accesses USB printers by a model-specific device URI like usb://ACME/FunPrinter?serial=1a2b3c. Usually it is not possible to predict the correct USB device URI in advance, because it is determined by the CUPS back-end usb during runtime. Therefore it is not possible to set up local print queues with AutoYaST.

Basics on how CUPS is used on a client workstation to print via network:

On client workstations application programs submit print jobs to the CUPS daemon process (cupsd). cupsd forwards the print jobs to a CUPS print server in the network where the print jobs are processed. The server sends the printer specific data to the printer device.

If there is only a single CUPS print server in the network, there is no need to have a CUPS daemon running on each client workstation. Instead it is simpler to specify the CUPS server in /etc/cups/client.conf and access it directly (only one CUPS server entry can be set). In this case application programs that run on client workstations submit print jobs directly to the specified CUPS print server.

Example 4.69, “Printer configuration” shows a printer configuration section. The cupsd_conf_content entry contains the whole verbatim content of the cupsd configuration file /etc/cups/cupsd.conf. The client_conf_content entry contains the whole verbatim content of /etc/cups/client.conf. The printer section contains the cupsd configuration but it does not specify whether the cupsd should run.

Example 4.69: Printer configuration
  <printer>
    <client_conf_content>
      <file_contents><![CDATA[
... verbatim content of /etc/cups/client.conf ...
]]></file_contents>
    </client_conf_content>
    <cupsd_conf_content>
      <file_contents><![CDATA[
... verbatim content of /etc/cups/cupsd.conf ...
]]></file_contents>
    </cupsd_conf_content>
  </printer>
Note
Note: /etc/cups/cups-files.conf

With release 1.6 the CUPS configuration file has been split into two files: cupsd.conf and cups-files.conf. As of openSUSE Leap 15.2, AutoYaST only supports modifying cupsd.conf since the default settings in cups-files.conf are sufficient for usual printing setups.

4.37.2 Sound devices Edit source

An example of the sound configuration created using the configuration system is shown below.

Example 4.70: Sound configuration
<sound>
  <autoinstall config:type="boolean">true</autoinstall>
  <modules_conf config:type="list">
    <module_conf>
      <alias>snd-card-0</alias>
      <model>M5451, ALI</model>
      <module>snd-ali5451</module>
      <options>
        <snd_enable>1</snd_enable>
        <snd_index>0</snd_index>
        <snd_pcm_channels>32</snd_pcm_channels>
      </options>
    </module_conf>
  </modules_conf>
  <volume_settings config:type="list">
    <listentry>
      <Master config:type="integer">75</Master>
    </listentry>
  </volume_settings>
</sound>

4.38 Importing SSH Keys and Configuration Edit source

YaST allows SSH keys and server configuration to be imported from previous installations. The behavior of this feature can also be controlled through an AutoYaST profile.

Example 4.71: Importing SSH Keys and Configuration from /dev/sda2
<ssh_import>
  <import config:type="boolean">true</import>
  <copy_config config:type="boolean">true</copy_config>
  <device>/dev/sda2</device>
</ssh_import>

Attributes

Value

Description

import

true / false

SSH keys will be imported. If set to false, nothing will be imported.

copy_config

true / false

Additionally, SSH server configuration will be imported. This setting will not have effect if import is set to false.

device

Partition

Partition to import keys and configuration from. If it is not set, the partition which contains the most recently accessed key is used.

4.39 Configuration Management Edit source

AutoYaST allows delegating part of the configuration to a configuration management tool like Salt. AutoYaST takes care of the basic system installation (partitioning, network setup, etc.) and the remaining configuration tasks can be delegated.

Note
Note: Only Salt is Officially Supported

Although Puppet is mentioned in this document, only Salt is officially supported. Nevertheless, feel free to report any problem you might find with Puppet.

AutoYaST supports two different approaches:

  • Using a configuration management server. In this case, AutoYaST sets up a configuration management tool. It connects to a master server to get the instructions to configure the system.

  • Getting the configuration from elsewhere (for example, an HTTP server or a flash disk like a USB stick) and running the configuration management tool in stand-alone mode.

4.39.1 Connecting to a Configuration Management Server Edit source

This approach is especially useful when a configuration management server (a master in Salt and Puppet jargon) is already in place. In this case, the hardest part might be to set up a proper authentication mechanism.

Both Salt and Puppet support the following authentication methods:

  • Manual authentication on the fly. When AutoYaST starts the client, a new authentication request is generated. The administrator can manually accept this request on the server. AutoYaST will retry the connection. If the key was accepted meanwhile, AutoYaST continues the installation.

  • Using a preseed key. Refer to the documentation of your configuration management system of choice to find out how to generate them. Use the keys_url option to tell AutoYaST where to look for them.

With the configuration example below, AutoYaST will launch the client to generate the authentication request. It will try to connect up to three times, waiting 15 seconds between each try.

Example 4.72: Client/Server with Manual Authentication
<configuration_management>
    <type>salt</type>
    <master>my-salt-server.example.net</master>
    <auth_attempts config:type="integer">3</auth_attempts>
    <auth_time_out config:type="integer">15</auth_time_out>
</configuration_management>

However, with the following example, AutoYaST will retrieve the keys from a flash disk (for example, USB stick) and will use them to connect to the master server.

Example 4.73: Client/Server with Preseed Keys
<configuration_management>
    <type>salt</type>
    <master>my-salt-server.example.net</master>
    <keys_url>usb:/</keys_url>
</configuration_management>

The table below summarizes the supported options for these scenarios.

Attributes

Value

Description

type

String

Configuration management name. Currently only salt is officially supported.

master

String

Host name or IP address of the configuration management server.

auth_attempts

Integer

Maximum attempts to connect to the server. The default is three attempts.

auth_time_out

Integer

Time (in seconds) between attempts to connect to the server. The default is 15 seconds.

keys_url

URL of used key

Path to an HTTP server, hard disk, flash drive or similar with the files default.key and default.pub. This key must be known to the configuration management master.

enable_services

True/False

Enables the configuration management services on the client side after the installation. The default is true.

4.39.2 Running in Stand-alone Mode Edit source

For simple scenarios, deploying a configuration management server is unnecessary. Instead, use Salt or Puppet in stand-alone (or masterless) mode.

As there is no server, AutoYaST needs to know where to get the configuration from. Put the configuration into a TAR archive and store it anywhere (for example, on a flash drive, an HTTP/HTTPS server, an NFS/SMB share).

The TAR archive must have the same layout that is expected under /srv in a Salt server. It means that you need to place your Salt states in a salt directory and your formulas in a separate formulas directory.

Additionally, you can have a pillar directory containing the pillar data. Alternatively, you can provide that data in a separate TAR archive by using the pillar_url option.

Example 4.74: Standalone Mode
<configuration_management>
    <type>salt</type>
    <states_url>my-salt-server.example.net</states_url>
    <pillar_url>my-salt-server.example.net</pillar_url>
</configuration_management>

Attributes

Value

Description

type

String

Configuration management name. Currently only salt is officially supported.

states_url

URL

Location of the Salt states TAR archive. It may include formulas and pillars. Files must be located in a salt directory.

pillar_url

URL

Location of the TAR archive that contains the pillars.

modules_url

URL

Location of Puppet modules.

4.39.3 SUSE Manager Salt Formulas Support Edit source

AutoYaST offers support for SUSE Manager Salt Formulas when running in stand-alone mode. In case a formula is found in the states TAR archive, AutoYaST displays a screen which allows the user to select and configure the formulas to apply.

Bear in mind that this feature defeats the AutoYaST purpose of performing an unattended installation, as AutoYaST will wait for the user's input.

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